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WCC Faith and Order Commission publishes two volumes on moral discernment

Current tensions within and between churches are often the result of disagreements over moral issues. Churches thus face challenges to preserve unity and meet obstacles to restore unity. Seeing the urgency of the matter, the World Council of Churches’ (WCC) Faith and Order Commission took up the task to assist the churches in finding a way to deepen mutual understanding leading to dialogue. Its study group on moral discernment presents two publications.

Churches and Moral Discernment

Volume 1: Learning from Traditions

Faith and Order Paper No. 228

The volume features 14 self-descriptions of different traditions regard­ing moral discernment: their sources, the interplay of sources, and the processes of ecclesial deliberation. The different self-descriptions are presented to enable reflection on and provide awareness of how processes of moral discernment are envisioned by the respective traditions. They invite the reader, as well as churches, to study them, reflect on the moral discernment of their own tradition, and learn how others engage in moral discernment.

 

Churches and Moral Discernment (II)

Volume 2: Learning from History

Faith and Order Paper No. 229

Many of the tensions between and among churches can be traced to the different positions they take on important ethical issues that face the churches and society. Yet, even within traditions positions change. In this second volume examining moral discernment in church traditions, the authors imagine changes in position on issues such as usury, slavery, marriage, suicide, as well as freedom of religion, apartheid, and involvement in war and peace.

Week of Prayer: can you picture it?

Can you help us create a global picture of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity? In times of pandemic, creative photos and illustrations are more inspirational than ever! Please send us your photo or illustration by 26 January.

Christians worldwide prepare to gather in prayer for unity— even if distanced

Even as nations continue to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic, final preparations are under way for one of the world’s largest annual prayer observances, traditionally celebrated 18-25 January. The Week of Prayer for Christian Unity involves Christian communities from many traditions and all parts of the globe. At a time when public health concerns put a limit on physical gatherings, it provides an opportunity for churches to come together by means of a typically Christian practice that long predates modern transport: prayer.

Rev. Shin Seung-min: “We want to create hope, not despair”

Rev. Shin Seung-min, programme executive of the National Council of Churches in Korea, firmly believes that Christians live by the power of prayer. As he looks back at one of the largest global prayer campaigns in which he’s ever been involved, he sees that the year 2020 brought forth the power of prayer in unprecedented ways, even amid a year that brought grave suffering to the world.

Education has a crucial role for sustainable peace in Iraq

In a series of workshops in Iraq, the role of education in promoting social cohesion and sustainable peace was discussed by education experts, representatives of government and of different ethnic groups, as well as Iraqi religious and community leaders.

WCC Christmas message 2020

But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. For see—I am bringing you good news of great joy for all the people: to you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, who is the Messiah. — Luke 2:10-11

The child in the manger, in its vulnerability, is an image of fragile hope, the beginning of a new story that will culminate in the gift of life and salvation through the death and resurrection of Jesus the Christ. There have been and there are today many reasons to be afraid and to live in despair. In the most difficult days of history, Christians have time and again found consolation and hope in the good news of Jesus Christ that begins with the birth of the Saviour in Bethlehem.

General Secretary

WCC executive committee maps future with hope in uncertain times

During its online meeting, 9-13 November, the World Council of Churches (WCC) executive committee addressed vital international developments, approved plans for 2021 and pledged support and solidarity with churches across the world at a time of multiple concurrent crises.

Study paper - "Converting Discipleship: Dissidence and Metanoia”

The study paper has been produced by the commission’s Working Group on Transforming Discipleship, which has been engaged since 2019 in a study process on the document “Arusha call to discipleship" in affirmation of the key place that discipleship holds across all levels of ecumenical work or denominational church work.

The paper "Converting Discipleship: Dissidence and Metanoia” aspires to move churches towards a transformation effected through discipleship. Addressing churches and communities locally, the document aims to inspire them to re-examine and finally re-shape their missional commitment.

Commission on World Mission and Evangelism