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Senior friends of WSCF: revisiting the past, creating a future

In 1895, student leaders from ten North American and European countries met at Vadstena Castle in Sweden to form the World Student Christian Federation (WSCF). Among its founders were John R. Mott (US), Karl Fries (Sweden), Martin Eckhoff (Norway), Luther D. Wishard (US), Johannes Siemsen (Germany), and J. Rutter Williamson (UK). The WSCF was the first international student organization and together with YMCA and YWCA, it is one of the oldest youth movements still in existence. 

WSCF 37th General Assembly: Rejoicing in Hope

The 37th Word Student Christian Federation  (WSCF) General Assembly officially kicked off  in Berlin with the theme, "Rejoice in Hope" (Romans 12:12), and a sub-theme of "Young People, Journeying Together Toward Justice and Peace.” Over 100 movements from 94 countries will attend this years assembly along with senior friends, partners, and guests from 24 -30 June.

Youth gathering will illuminate a special space in days before WCC 11th Assembly

An Ecumenical Youth Gathering on 27-30 August will convene a circle of young agents of change for the ecumenical movement’s present and future just days before the World Council of Churches (WCC) 11th Assembly in Karlsruhe, Germany. 

The Ecumenical Youth Gathering will comprise three tracks: one especially for young delegates to the WCC 11th Assembly, one for stewards, and one for representatives of WCC member churches and ecumenical partners.
 

Seven Weeks for Water 2022, week 2: "Water Justice towards Gender Justice", by Nicqi Ashwood

The second reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2022 of the WCC’s Ecumenical Water Network is written by Nicole Ashwood (Nicqi).* In the following reflection , which was  written around the International Women’s Day, she reflects how the women in the story of Exodus were deprived of water and how Moses came up to their defense  and provided them and their flock with water. Then she  highlights how developed countries in Europe, including Switzerland fares in getting access to clean water and how it affects the health, wellbeing and dignity of the people, particularly, women, everywhere.

Digital communicators weigh a future with “profound values at stake”

As a symposium on digital justice drew to a close on 15 September, participants  were weighing their vision for the future in a landscape fraught with injustice. Those taking part in the symposium—be they theologians, church leaders, politicians, students, journalists or professional communicators—are all in fact, digital communicators,” and this broad array of people who care worked to hone their collective thoughts into recommendations they believe can help the world.

Digital justice most relevant for those under autocratic rule, says Christian advocate

Digital justice is relevant to everyone in the digital age, yet it is more important to those living under an autocratic government that can use digital technologies for surveillance of civilians, says a Protestant Christian who works in advocacy.

Her work involves supporting non-governmental organizations (NGOs) across Asia and Europe, and she asked for her name not to be used.
 

Digital justice with fair access remains a goal, says Ukrainian journalist

Ukrainian journalist and radio host Katya Potapenko says digital justice remains a goal and not a reality. "For me, digital justice is a possibility of fair access to digital platforms and devices, regardless of country of origin, social status or other features," said Potapenko, a World Student Christian Federation volunteer.