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WCC mourns loss and celebrates life of Martin Conway

The World Council of Churches (WCC) is mourning the loss and celebrating the life of Martin Conway, who passed away on 14 January at age 87. An Anglican who was a lifelong advocate for the ecumenical movement, he served as a staff member with the World Council of Churches (WCC), World Student Christian Federation, British Council of Churches, and other groups.

WCC elects executive committee

The World Council of Churches (WCC) central committee elected the WCC executive committee on 8 September during the WCC 11th Assembly in Karlsruhe.

From the Ashes of War: The first WCC Assembly in Europe – Amsterdam 1948

As participants in the First Assembly of the World Council of Churches (WCC) gathered at Amsterdam during August 1948, the Netherlands bore witness to the violence of the Second World War. The port of Rotterdam was rising from near destruction. Many other cities, towns and villages across Europe were struggling to recover. To the east, Germany and Austria were divided into zones of occupation administered by the Allied Powers. Two months earlier, tensions between the Soviet Union and the Western occupiers of the former German capital led to the start of the Berlin Airlift. Since 1945, publications had been increasing their use of the term “Cold War”.

Unity is key when health crisis poses new challenges in Asia

As the COVID-19 pandemic slowly fades, its severe impact on people’s lives lingers on throughout Asia and the rest of the world. In addition to the sufferings and tragic losses of lives caused by the virus, hopes for a brighter future have been dimmed by social isolation, economic recession, increased unemployment and poverty.

Stop Hoping. Start Resisting.

If you try hard and believe in the power of positive thinking, you may be able to take comfort that COP26 provided some hope. But if you remove the rose-colored spectacles, it becomes clear that we should abandon the sentiment of hope and commit to lives of faithful resistance.

Digital justice most relevant for those under autocratic rule, says Christian advocate

Digital justice is relevant to everyone in the digital age, yet it is more important to those living under an autocratic government that can use digital technologies for surveillance of civilians, says a Protestant Christian who works in advocacy.

Her work involves supporting non-governmental organizations (NGOs) across Asia and Europe, and she asked for her name not to be used.