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In Asia, COVID-19 “is a spotlight exposing fault lines” of injustice

With each wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, communities have been experiencing collective trauma that has further deepened the injustices, including racism and economic inequity,” said Rev. Dr Sang Chang, World Council of Churches (WCC) president for Asia, during an online consultation, organised by the WCC and the Christian Conference of Asia on 4 June.

Morning Prayer for Monday, 7 June 2021

Commemorating the World Day of the Environment (June 5).

This week following the Ecumenical Prayer Cycle, we are praying with and for people and churches in Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia and South Africa.

 

Religious leaders in Uganda renew commitment to eliminating stigma, ending HIV

Religious leaders in Uganda pledged to renew their commitment to the national struggle to end HIV and AIDS as a public health threat by 2030, end all forms of stigma, promote justice, model transformative masculinities and transformative femininities, and ensure that respect for human rights is at the center of responses to HIV and AIDS.

Inclusive communication: “words change the world”

The World Council of Churches (WCC) Communication has published new internal guidelines to ensure inclusive and accessible communication. In the recent past, WCC communication has been stepping up efforts to have a more inclusive and accessible communication. One example is that the development of the new WCC website took into consideration accessibility needs of persons with disabilities. Another example: the WCC has been testing sign language interpreta-tion in webinars. In 2021, the communication team explored even more ways to ensure our communication work is inclusive and maintains high accessibility as we prepare for the WCC 11th Assembly in Karlsruhe—and beyond. All this necessitated the need to have guidelines for inclusive and accessible communication.    

WCC welcomes ceasefire, urges stronger UN Security Council action for a just and sustainable peace in the Holy Land

In a letter to the UN Security Council, the World Council of Churches (WCC) welcomed the establishment of a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas, while at the same time urging the UN to take a more assertive role to ensure the ceasefire is not simply a lull in the violence. The letter laments the  heavy toll in civilian lives, especially children and women” - which has overwhelmingly affected the people of Gaza but which has also affected communities in Israel - as well as the destruction of schools and hospitals, and the attacks on the international media during this conflict. The responsibility under international law to protect these populations and institutions is fundamental” the letter stresses, “and there must be accountability for violations thereof.”

WCC letter to UN Security Council on monitoring ceasefire between Israel and Hamas

The World Council of Churches, with more than 350 member churches in 120 countries representing over 560 million people globally, welcomes the establishment of a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas which has brought a desperately-needed respite from the violence, bloodshed and destruction that Secretary-General Guterres rightly described as “appalling” and “senseless”.

General Secretary

"Because God Loves Me,” new French curriculum, will help youth address gender-based violence

The World Council of Churches (WCC) is publishing “Because God Loves Me—Affirming My Value in Christ,” a new curriculum written in French that is designed to help children ages 7-12 address gender-based violence.

Though the curriculum, edited by Yvette A. Kelem and Blandine E. Ackla, was developed for use primarily with churches and church groups in Africa, it is relevant and accessible for other French-speaking populations as well. 
 

Arctic communities to WCC pilgrims: “We need your voice”

Lorraine Netro, who was raised in the Gwichin First Nation of Old Crow, Yukon (Canada), is part of an indigenous community—but shes also a global citizen.

Todays Arctic peoples are important members of global society,” Netro said. The survival of Arctic cultures and communities remains tied to the wildlife and landscape of the Arctic Refuge.”