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WCC Faith and Order Commission publishes two volumes on moral discernment

Current tensions within and between churches are often the result of disagreements over moral issues. Churches thus face challenges to preserve unity and meet obstacles to restore unity. Seeing the urgency of the matter, the World Council of Churches’ (WCC) Faith and Order Commission took up the task to assist the churches in finding a way to deepen mutual understanding leading to dialogue. Its study group on moral discernment presents two publications.

Churches and Moral Discernment

Volume 1: Learning from Traditions

Faith and Order Paper No. 228

The volume features 14 self-descriptions of different traditions regard­ing moral discernment: their sources, the interplay of sources, and the processes of ecclesial deliberation. The different self-descriptions are presented to enable reflection on and provide awareness of how processes of moral discernment are envisioned by the respective traditions. They invite the reader, as well as churches, to study them, reflect on the moral discernment of their own tradition, and learn how others engage in moral discernment.

 

Churches and Moral Discernment (II)

Volume 2: Learning from History

Faith and Order Paper No. 229

Many of the tensions between and among churches can be traced to the different positions they take on important ethical issues that face the churches and society. Yet, even within traditions positions change. In this second volume examining moral discernment in church traditions, the authors imagine changes in position on issues such as usury, slavery, marriage, suicide, as well as freedom of religion, apartheid, and involvement in war and peace.

A hymn of hope ringing out loud during lockdown

In the midst of the nationwide lockdown, caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in North Germany finds new ways to connect people in its congregations. It encourages all people to step out on balconies or come together by open windows, at 8 pm on Christmas Eve, and let their voices ring out loud in the Christmas carol "Silent Night.”

A hopeful, but not optimistic Palestinian ecumenist

With olive harvest season coming to an end, life under occupation returns to “normal” for Palestinian communities on the West Bank. Under that “normal,” which means forced displacements and constant fear of threats and harassments, now also looms a threatening Israeli annexation of large chunks of fertile land owned by Palestinian farmers – a move which would “undermine peace and justice and be in direct violation of international law,” according to a joint ecumenical statement by the WCC and other ecumenical organizations earlier this year.  

WCC Christmas message 2020

But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. For see—I am bringing you good news of great joy for all the people: to you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, who is the Messiah. — Luke 2:10-11

The child in the manger, in its vulnerability, is an image of fragile hope, the beginning of a new story that will culminate in the gift of life and salvation through the death and resurrection of Jesus the Christ. There have been and there are today many reasons to be afraid and to live in despair. In the most difficult days of history, Christians have time and again found consolation and hope in the good news of Jesus Christ that begins with the birth of the Saviour in Bethlehem.

General Secretary

Responding to the Arusha Call - Mission Rediscovered: Transforming Disciples will debut during webinar

A book by Ken Ross, Mission Rediscovered: Transforming Disciples, will be released during a webinar on 2 December 2020. A commentary on the Arusha Call to Discipleship, the publication unpacks the meaning of the 12-part summons of the Arusha Call. With an up-to-date theological and missiological view on the Arusha Call, the book also offers a personal reflection on the state of a world desperately in need of change and transformation.

Cooler Earth - Higher Benefits

Actions by those who care about children, climate and finance.
Frederique Seidel
Emmanuel de Martel

The publication gives suggestions of how churches and other organizations around the world can respond to the climate emergency through investment decisions which are crucial to protect children from global warming.

WCC executive committee to convene online 9-13 November

The executive committee of the World Council of Churches (WCC) will meet online 9-13 November to address plans and budget for 2021, review planning for the WCC 11th Assembly in Germany in 2022, and the ongoing implications of COVID-19 on the life and work of the fellowship. The leadership body will also discuss current world situations on which public statements may be needed.