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Webinar explores how women navigate nexus of water, food and climate change

Held in conjunction with the 66th session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, a World Council of Churches’ (WCC) webinar explored how women are navigating the water, food, and climate change nexus. Panellists and participants shared women-led and gender-just responses to the climate crisis as well as the role of churches and faith-based organisations.

Rivers, oceans, lakes all interconnected in God's patterns for nature, WCC webinar hears

The Rewa River is the longest and widest river in Fiji on the island of Viti Levu, originating in Tomanivi, the highest peak in the country, and is of enormous importance to local indigenous culture, explains Rev. James Bhagwan.

As general secretary of the Pacific Conference of Churches, Bhagwan offered opening remarks and prayers at a World Council of Churches (WCC) webinar titled "Food from Oceans, Rivers and Lakes" on 28 January with participants from every part of planet earth.

Webinar will highlight experts’ reflections on “Food from Oceans, Rivers and Lakes”

A upcoming webinar will offer speakersinsights on Food from Oceans, Rivers and Lakes.” Offered on 28 or 27 January (depending on time zone), the webinar will explore the vital role of blue, or aquatic, foods in the wellbeing and livelihood of 3 billion people in the world. But the health of the water bodies is being degraded by climate change,  pollution, unsustainable overfishing, and mining.

Webinar on ’Racism, Land and Food’

15 December 2021

This webinar will explore the intersections of food, land, and racial injustice and discern key lessons from initiatives and good practices that work to overcome the impact of racial injustice and inequity on food sovereignty. 

Online (by registration)

Climate crisis fuels existing water injustice

2021 has shown how vulnerable and unprepared even wealthy, industrialized countries are in the face of the escalating climate crisis. Devastating flooding, unprecedented heat waves and out-of-control wildfires have hit parts of Europe and North America. Yet this is just a foretaste of catastrophes that have long since become a bitter reality in other parts of the world. They are almost always a matter of too much or too little water. Yet water problems are often the result of discrimination and political failure, especially in times of climate change.

In Argentina, “Serving a Wounded World” is a hopeful call to collaborate

Prof. Dr h.c. Humberto Martin Shikiya, vice president of the Regional Ecumenical Advisory and Service Center (CREAS) In Argentina, reflects on how Serving a Wounded World in Interreligious Solidarity: A Christian Call to Reflection and Action During COVID-19 and Beyond” is being received as a hopeful call to collaborate ecumenically and interreligiously. The World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue jointly published Serving a Wounded World” to encourage churches and Christian organizations to reflect on the importance of interreligious solidarity in a world wounded by the COVID-19 pandemic.

In Lebanon, “without peace there is no justice”

When Dr Michel Abs, secretary general of the Middle East Council of Churches, speaks about living conditions in Lebanon, his compassion for his people—and his passion for peace—brim over. In a video interview with the World Council of Churches, he honestly shared his deepest concerns about the current socio-economic crisis in his nation, and how churches are helping.

WCC honors world’s indigenous communities

The World Council of Churches (WCC) will join many in honoring indigenous communities across the world on 9 August. Designated by the United Nations as “International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples,” this year the day is particularly honoring indigenous people for seeking unique solutions to the COVID-19 pandemic, and for leading the way in sustainable living in a post-COVID-19 era.