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Webinar - “People on the Move: Solidarity and Advocacy”

12 November 2020

A 12 November webinar entitled “People on the Move: Solidarity and Advocacy” will highlight the experiences and often untold stories of refugees, stateless persons, seasonal and migrant workers, and undocumented persons, with a particular focus on ways they have been affected by COVID-19.

https://www.oikoumene.org/live

On 10th anniversary of right to water, we still strive for “ambitious promise of water and sanitation for all”

During a webtalk entitled “10 years Human Right to Water - problems, positions, perspectives,” held on 1 September, expert speakers highlighted how the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the acute lack of water and the unacceptable sanitary conditions in which large parts of the world’s population have to live every day. Some 3 in 10 people worldwide still do not have safe access to clean drinking water. More than half of the global population cannot use acceptable toilets.

Sustainable Environment: churches in action - a NCCI/WCC webinar

04 June 2020

The theme for World Environment Day, 5 June 2020 is biodiversity — a call to action to combat the accelerating species loss and degradation of the natural world. One million plant and animal species risk extinction, largely due to human activities. According to the WWF, Humanity has wiped out 60% of mammals, birds, fish and reptiles since 1970.

Ecumenical Review focuses on “Global Manifestations of Racism Today”

The latest issue of The Ecumenical Review, the quarterly journal of the World Council of Churches (WCC), focuses on “Global Manifestations of Racism Today,” with a set of articles that originated at a theological symposium organized in Japan in 2019 as part of the WCC’s Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace.

Forum asks: “How are churches accountable for racism?”

At an Ecumenical Strategic Forum, convened by the World Council of Churches (WCC) on 9-10 May, religious leaders examined the painful history of racism and also asked difficult questions about how churches may be accountable for racism today. Representatives from WCC specialized ministries, roundtable partners and other global actors explored the complexities of racism, xenophobia and racial discrimination.

Beyond herself

She was asked to lead us in prayers for the people of the Balkans, especially Kosovo and Albania. Before praying, she shared a bit of her story. It was an important story, for she was living in another European country and her story intermingled with others who could easily have slipped through the cracks.

Seven Weeks for Water 2019, week 4: "Stigma and discrimination: an impediment to human right to water, with specific reference to Casteism in India", by Rev. Dr Raj Bharat Patta

The fourth reflection of the “Seven Weeks for Water 2019” of World Council of Churches’ Ecumenical Water Network is by Rev. Dr Raj BharatPatta, an ordained minister of the Andhra Evangelical Lutheran Church in India. He has recently completed his PhD on the topic Subaltern Public Theology for India from the University of Manchester, UK. He served the Student Christian Movement of India as its national General Secretary and also the National Council of Churches in India as one of its Executive Secretaries, particularly focusing on Dalit and indigenous people. He currently serves as an Authorised Presbyter at the Stockport Methodist Circuit in UK with a pastoral charge of three churches. In the following reflection, he narrates the story of Hagar through her voice, when she was left in the desert to fend for herself without an adequate supply of water to survive with and to keep her son Ishmael alive. Patta, draws similarities between the Dalit communities in India and that of Hagar, when it comes to access to water.

WCC Programmes

Seven Weeks for Water 2019, week 2: "Pilgrimage of water justice in the context of India", by Metropolitan Dr. Geevarghese Mor Coorilos

The second Reflection of the “Seven Weeks for Water 2019” of World Council of Churches’ Ecumenical Water Network is by Metropolitan Dr. Geevarghese Mor Coorilos, the Bishop of Niranam diocese of the Jacobite Syrian Orthodox Church in India. He also serves the World Council of Churches as Moderator of the Commission on World Mission and Evangelism.  In this reflection, he elaborates on the story of Jesus's encounter with the Samaritan woman at the well and relates it to the Indian context of caste untouchability and discrimination.

WCC Programmes

WCC represented at International Sanitation Convention in India

World Council of Churches Ecumenical Water Network (WCC-EWN) coordinator Dinesh Suna attended the International Sanitation Convention from 29 September - 2 October in India. Suna shared his reflections on the conference, the role of EWN, and the future of sanitation and how it affects justice in the lives of millions of people.

Is there any room for talk of transition in the Christian message?

These days everyone uses the words “change” or “transformation” yet they are used to describe very different things. The French president Emmanuel Macron speaks of the transformation of the French economy through the liberalisation of labour laws, and in his book “India Transformed” Rakesh Mohan describes the benefits achieved by 25 years of neo-liberalism. So what do church-related aid organisations like Action de Carême, Pain pour le prochain and Etre partenaires mean when they use the word “transition”? Is this concept really part of the Christian message?