Displaying 1 - 20 of 20

Seven Weeks for Water 2022, week 7: “Pilgrimage of water justice in Europe,” by Prof. Dr Isabel Apawo Phiri

The seventh and final reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2022 of the WCCs Ecumenical Water Network is written by Prof. Dr Isabel Apawo Phiri*. In the following reflection she, being the staff focal point of WCCs Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace, makes a compelling analysis of how the WCC pilgrimage and the pilgrimage of water justice inter-relate, complement, and strengthen each other, with a particular reference to Europe.

Seven Weeks for Water 2022, week 6 “Water is a gift of God, a common good and a human right” by Dinesh Suna

The sixth reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2022 of the WCC’s Ecumenical Water Network is written by Dinesh Suna.* In the following reflection ,  he gives a historical background of the WCC's water justice ministry and reaffirms that water is a gift of God, a common good and human right. Taking the inspiration from Isaiah, he calls the churches to become blue communities and say no to privatisation of water and to bottled water.

Seven Weeks for Water 2022, week 5: “Water – a blessing and a threat?”, by Peter Pavlovic

The fifth reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2022 of the WCC’s Ecumenical Water Network is written by Peter Pavlovic.* He reflects that  Europe is a water rich continent, still, a lot of concerns related to water availability persist in the region.  Climate change makes this problem worse, our vulnerability is, as the last IPCC report warns, increasingly exposed.  Faith describes the world as a gift of God given to humanity. Fragility of our existence is closely related to disrespecting the limits of the world in which we live and is rooted in the failure of our relationship with God.

Seven Weeks for Water 2022, week 3: “Care for Creation and Water for life”, by Louk Adrianos

The third reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2022 of the WCC’s Ecumenical Water Network is written by Louk Andrianos.* He reflects on the  words of God found in James and John, by warning Christians about less recognized  “ecological sins" toward water: “pollution.” When our thirst is not quenched by Jesus Christ’s water and we follow the worldly consumption lifestyle, we act sometimes as springs of polluted water that are destroying creation instead of giving life to it. We cannot be the source of blessing and cursing (James 3: 10-11). 

11th Assembly Bible study - Easter

Part of a series of Bible studies in preparation for the WCC 11th Assembly, this fifth text was written by Bishop Maxim (Vasiljevic), bishop of the Diocese of Los Angeles and Western America of the Serbian Orthodox Church.

Thursdays in Black Bible study series- Difficult Paths (Matthew 16:21–23)

The Rev. Dr Anders Göranzon is the general secretary of the Swedish Bible Society. He has been an ordained priest in the Church of Sweden since 1987 and has served in different capacities as a parish priest and as a teacher of homiletics at the Church of Sweden Institute for Pastoral Education. He also worked for seven and a half years in South Africa. He holds a PhD in Ecclesiology from the University of the Free State in South Africa and has been an honorary lecturer at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa.
 

Thursdays in Black Bible study series - Gender, Economics, and Structural Injustice (Ruth 16–13)

Amanda Khozi Mukwashi is the chief executive officer of Christian Aid, a global movement of people, churches, and local organizations working to end poverty. Her career spans intergovernmental and non-governmental spaces, including the UN, VSO (Voluntary Service Overseas) International, and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa. She is the author of But Where Are You Really From? published by SPCK Publishing in 2020.

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 7: "Healing the water heals the wounds of the earth and its people", by Andrew Schwartz

The seventh and last reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the WCC’s Ecumenical Water Network is written by Andrew Schwartz.* In the following reflection during Holy Week, he is using a small town in the USA as a case study to emphasise how local communities can take small initiatives to “resurrect” the contaminated or “dead” groundwater to form life giving waters.   Leaving us on a positive note, he ends by saying, “if Holy Week teaches us anything it’s that death is not final.”

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 6: "A universe reborn: in the context of Standing Rock", by Archbishop Mark MacDonald

The 6th reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the WCC’s Ecumenical Water Network is written by Archbishop Mark MacDonald.*  In the following reflection, he recognises that Jesus and his ministry are closely associated with water. Then he goes on to recall his presence at the Standing Rock protests in 2016 along with other clergy and indigenous water protectors.  He felt, at that time, that Jesus was also present beside them at the Standing Rock to protect its waters.

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 5: "Water on Wall Street: the ultimate abuse of God’s gift", by Susan Smith and Dinesh Suna

The 5th reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the WCC’s Ecumenical Water Network (EWN) is written by Susan Smith and Dinesh Suna.*  In the following reflection, they condemn the recent listing of water on Wall Street as a tradable commodity.  Referring to the biblical assurance that God will quench the thirst of the poor and needy and that water should be made available to all even if they have no money, they proclaim the true value of water as a gift from God, a human right, a spiritual wonder and the source of all life. 

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 4: "Gendered water: women fight for safe drinking water in their communities", by Krystina White

The 4th reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the WCC Ecumenical Water Network is written by Krystina White.* In the following reflection, she narrates her experience of how people of colour are denied their right to clean water because of lead poisoning of tap water in Flint, Michigan (USA). She further demonstrates how ordinary women, though at the receiving end, can do extraordinary work, just like Deborah, the prophetess in the Bible.  White and her friends challenged the lead contamination of Flint’s waters through the Black Millennials 4 Flint and offered lasting solutions to communities facing the crisis.

 

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 3: "Water for creation: protecting water for the sacred C’iyaal, C’waam and Koptu", by Jesse Cruz Richards

The 3rd reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the World Council of Churches (WCC) Ecumenical Water Network is written by Jesse Cruz Richards.*  The following reflection draws inspiration from the restoration of the Israelites from Babylonian exile as promised by Ezekiel, and from hopes and prayers for the restoration of the Klamath Tribes and other indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest to their rivers, waters and fishes, namely the C’iyaal, C’waam and Koptu. 

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 2: "Water for life: not guaranteed for the indigenous people of the Navajo Nation", by Annika Harley

The 2nd reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the WCC Ecumenical Water Network is written by Annika Harley.*  In the following reflection, Harley highlights the challenges of mining and fracking in the Navajo Nation based on her conversation with Bitahnii Wayne Wilson, who not only challenges these unsustainable practices, but also provides small-scale solutions to indigenous communities in the time of COVID-19.