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Borders and Migrants

On 20 May 2022, a group of us, 14 pilgrims from different parts of the world (Kenya, Brussels, Germany, Hong Kong, Philippines, Poland, Rome, Korea, Canada, Fiji, Australia, London, Scotland, and Geneva—a very diverse group) gathered in Palermo, Italy for a Pilgrim Team Visit on the theme of migration. 

Faith based organisations underline creation justice in Stockholm+50 webinar

The World Council of Churches (WCC) and International Partnership on Religion and Sustainable Development (PaRD) co-hosted  a hybrid event on 2 June at Stockholm+50. Exploring the theme “Climate Action and Water for Life towards Creation Justice!” the event  reflected on the current scenario of the climate emergency and global water crisis which are interconnected and impact each other as well as the sustainability of the earth. 

Webinar explores “Two years after the death of George Floyd: Antiracism, #BLM and the United Nations”

A 25 May webinar explored the theme Two years after George Floyd’s death: Antiracism, #BLM and the United Nations.” As people continue to challenge the systemic racism that has devalued the lives of Black and Brown people globally, many are asking the question: how much progress have we seen in the last two years? why do some of these tragic events spark a stronger call for change than others?

WCC visit to Italy harvests examples of the churches’ unconditional support to refugees and migrants

The Central Mediterranean route is the overseas crossing from North Africa to Italy. Those migrating on this route generally aim to reach Italian shores but leave from a variety of North African countries bordering the Mediterranean. Though in past years most migrants have departed from Libya, which is a destination for migrants as well as a transit country, there is also a proportionally small but growing number of departures from Tunisia, Egypt, and Algeria.

African women church leaders: “Where is there justice today?”

As African women church leaders gathered last week for an inaugural “Ecumenical Women’s Initiative for Leadership and Learning”, they lamented grave injustices, celebrated women pioneers, and nurtured a spirit of solidarity they hope will blaze a global trail for the future. 

Groundwater is “a political question”

In many regions, groundwater is being extracted faster than it can be replenished. Groundwater pollution from raw material extraction, industry, private households, and agriculture is also increasing. This year’s UN’s World Water Day focused on groundwater, urging to make “the invisible visible.” A new publication by Brot für die Welt (Bread for the World, Germany), a member of the WCC Ecumenical Water Network, takes up this call and demands the better protection and fairer use of this vital resource.  WCC news talked to co-author Dr Ingrid Jacobsen about the social and political dimension of groundwater.