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Seven Weeks for Water 2022, week 7: “Pilgrimage of water justice in Europe,” by Prof. Dr Isabel Apawo Phiri

The seventh and final reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2022 of the WCCs Ecumenical Water Network is written by Prof. Dr Isabel Apawo Phiri*. In the following reflection she, being the staff focal point of WCCs Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace, makes a compelling analysis of how the WCC pilgrimage and the pilgrimage of water justice inter-relate, complement, and strengthen each other, with a particular reference to Europe.

Seven Weeks for Water campaign pre-launched with prayer service

At an online prayer service for staff held 28 February, the World Council of Churches (WCC) pre-launched the WCC Lenten campaign “Seven Weeks for Water.” Since 2008, the WCC – through its Lenten campaign – has been providing weekly theological reflections and other resources on water justice for the seven weeks of Lent. This year the focus of the campaign is on Europe.

WCC posts job openings for leadership staff

Following the decision of the Executive Committee during its meeting of November 2021, the World Council of Churches (WCC) is posting the opening of three staff leadership positions. The openings include programme director for Unity and Mission, programme director for Public Witness and Diakonia, and director of the WCC Commission on Faith and Order.

Dr Agnes Abuom shares details on February WCC central committee meeting

The WCC executive committee held a special meeting on 4 January and reached a decision to hold the upcoming WCC central committee meeting, scheduled for 9-15 February, online rather than in-person as previously planned. Below, WCC central committee moderator Dr Agnes Abuom shares some details behind the decision, and plans for moving forward.

Programme to Combat Racism began during apartheid, but xenophobia fight still churches’ focus

When the World Council of Churches (WCC) launched the Programme to Combat Racism after years of in-depth theological reflections and prayer in 1971, South Africa's insidious racist apartheid policies were in full throw. The programme brought the WCC into the world's spotlight. Yet racism did not start 50 years ago. And it did not end with the casting out of apartheid at the end of the 20th century. During that era, figures such as Nobel Peace Prize laureates Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Nelson Mandela fought racism in society and the church.