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Tenth Report Study Documents

Joint Working Group between the Roman Catholic Church and the World Council of Churches

Peace is a Treasure for All: An Ecumenical Reflection on Peacebuilding in Situations of Conflict and Violence

Migrants and Refugees: Ecumenical Challenges and Opportunities

These Study Documents to the JWG 10th Report—Walking, Praying and Working Together, together with the report, encourage intensive ecumenical cooperation of all Christians and people of goodwill, with a particular emphasis on the contributions that can be made by the WCC and the RCC together.

Walking, Praying and Working Together

10th Report of the Joint Working Group of the WCC and the Roman Catholic Church

The JWG offers this report and two study documents to the 11th Assembly in Karlsruhe in 2022 with recommendations for the parent bodies. The study documents address two critical areas of ecumenical cooperation in today’s world:

Peace Is a Treasure for All: An Ecumenical Reflection on Peacebuilding in Situations of Conflict, and

Violence and Migrants and Refugees: Ecumenical Challenges and Opportunities Together, these documents encourage intensive ecumenical cooperation of all Christians and people of goodwill, with a particular emphasis on the contributions that can be made by the WCC and the RCC together.

Multilateral Ecumenism. Sixty Years of Experience From the Perspective of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity

In the field of multilateral relations, the major partner of the Catholic Church is the World Council of Churches (WCC). Founded in 1948, it is the broadest and most inclusive ecumenical organization, bringing together 350 Christian denominations including Orthodox, Lutherans, Reformed, Anglicans, Methodists, Baptists as well as United and Independent churches. Altogether they represent over 500 million Christians worldwide.

How can you help refugees?

What else could your family, your parish, your community do to respond to the needs of migrants and refugees arriving in your country? Representatives of many different churches met in Rome in September to discuss that practical question, as well as respond to the broader challenge of how people of faith can combat the rising tide of racism, xenophobia and nationalist policies that increasingly target vulnerable migrants and asylum seekers.