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Churches and Moral Discernment (III) - Facilitating Dialogue to Build Koinonia

The study document “Churches and Moral Discernment: Facilitating Dialogue to Build Koinonia,” harvests the fruits of the study process on moral discernment which began in 2015. In its analysis, the document describes patterns in the complex negotiations between continuity and change as churches respond to moral challenges. At its core, the study document invites the churches to more deeply understand the significance of “the conscience of the church” in moral discernment processes and points to its ecumenical potential. The document offers a tool to analyse core elements in the conscience of the church that shape moral discernment.

Indigenous peoples and the pandemic in the land of inequalities

476 million indigenous people live around the world, of which 11.5% live in our Latin American region. In these years that we are going from the COVID 19 pandemic in our territories (indigenous or tribal at the Latin American level), the presence of many extractive companies, mainly uranium and lithium, has increased, land traffickers and among other monoculture companies with fires for the cultivation of oil palm, logging, putting vulnerable peoples at greater risk than what is already experienced.

100 years after Tulsa massacre, webinar remembers victims

A webinar on 1 June—100 years after the Tulsa race massacre—honored the legacy of victims of past massacres.

From Tulsa, Rev. Dr Robert Turner, pastor of Historic Vernon chapel A.M.E. church and academic dean for Jackson Theological Seminary, spoke as he was getting ready to commemorate the victims of the massacre.

WCC digital archive now included in Globethics.net library

A collection of documents and publications from the World Council of Churches (WCC) is now available through its longstanding partner organization Globethics.net. The WCC collection, updated weekly, reflects a growing and longstanding electronic bridge between the organizations’ websites.

Because God Loves Me - Affirming My Value in Christ

“Because God Loves Me—Affirming My Value in Christ,” a new curriculum written in French that is designed to help children ages 7-12 address gender-based violence.

Though the curriculum, edited by Yvette A. Kelem and Blandine E. Ackla, was developed for use primarily with churches and church groups in Africa, it is relevant and accessible for other French-speaking populations as well.

The Christian education programme encourages the full involvement of children, adolescents and youth in becoming early proponents of nonviolence. Developed for children's Bible study leaders, teachers, parish volunteers, and others who work with children, the curriculum serves as a guide to help churches live into their responsibility to protect all children, girls and women from gender-based violence.

#CandleOfJustice will mark anniversary of the killing of George Floyd

Churches Together in England will be marking the anniversary of the killing of George Floyd on 25 May with a special #CandleOfJustice.

Churches will be uniting at noon that day to light a candle, pray and commit to taking personal and institutional action to tackle racism in society and in churches.
 

African church leaders to declare stand on climate change

African church leaders are convening at a roundtable hosted by the All Africa Conference of Churches from 18-20 May in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa to deliberate on the impact of climate change in Africa, and the need for the voices of the ecumenical community to be heard.

Ecumenical groups gather to prepare for UN climate talks

On the road to the next UN Climate Conference (the 26th Conference of Parties, or COP 26), churches and groups from a range of Christian traditions organised a webinar titled, “Raise Your Voice in Faith for Climate Justice,” on 13 May as part of the Global Action and Prayer for Climate Justice. 

Arctic communities to WCC pilgrims: “We need your voice”

Lorraine Netro, who was raised in the Gwichin First Nation of Old Crow, Yukon (Canada), is part of an indigenous community—but shes also a global citizen.

Todays Arctic peoples are important members of global society,” Netro said. The survival of Arctic cultures and communities remains tied to the wildlife and landscape of the Arctic Refuge.”