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Rivers, oceans, lakes all interconnected in God's patterns for nature, WCC webinar hears

The Rewa River is the longest and widest river in Fiji on the island of Viti Levu, originating in Tomanivi, the highest peak in the country, and is of enormous importance to local indigenous culture, explains Rev. James Bhagwan.

As general secretary of the Pacific Conference of Churches, Bhagwan offered opening remarks and prayers at a World Council of Churches (WCC) webinar titled "Food from Oceans, Rivers and Lakes" on 28 January with participants from every part of planet earth.

Webinar will highlight experts’ reflections on “Food from Oceans, Rivers and Lakes”

A upcoming webinar will offer speakersinsights on Food from Oceans, Rivers and Lakes.” Offered on 28 or 27 January (depending on time zone), the webinar will explore the vital role of blue, or aquatic, foods in the wellbeing and livelihood of 3 billion people in the world. But the health of the water bodies is being degraded by climate change,  pollution, unsustainable overfishing, and mining.

With boldness of faith, joy and peace, Pan African women hold “Ubuntu” gathering

Women of faith who are African or of African descent held a powerful recent gathering, Ubuntu: Remembrance, Diversity, and Advocacy in Unity Now!” in which they shared their call to action with a sense of Sankofa, or a season of now while looking back and forward. The event was organized by the Pan African Women’s Ecumenical Empowerment Network (PAWEEN) and Pan African Women of Faith (PAW).

WCC invites webinar on ’Racism, Land and Food’

The World Council of Churches (WCC) invites a webinar on ’Racism, Land and Food’ to explore the intersections of food, land, and racial injustices, and discern ways to overcome the impact of racial injustice and inequity on food sovereignty.

Groundbreaking global conference opens gates to a Pan-Africanism for all and with all to finally defeat scourge of racism

Over 23-29 October, a Global Conference of Africa and Africans in the Diaspora (AAD) revisited the historical 1945 Manchester Pan-African Conference and critically reviewed progress made since then. Speakers and participants also worked to determine and develop effective global strategies to radically change the lot of Africans and people of African descent globally—and thereby defeat the scourge of racism in the world.