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Faith based organisations underline creation justice in Stockholm+50 webinar

The World Council of Churches (WCC) and International Partnership on Religion and Sustainable Development (PaRD) co-hosted  a hybrid event on 2 June at Stockholm+50. Exploring the theme “Climate Action and Water for Life towards Creation Justice!” the event  reflected on the current scenario of the climate emergency and global water crisis which are interconnected and impact each other as well as the sustainability of the earth. 

Interfaith statement at Stockholm+50 urges commitment “to become protectors of this earth”

An interfaith statement developed at Stockholm+50, Faith Values and Reach - Contribution to Environmental Policy,” was signed by representatives of various faith-based organizations and Indigenous cultures across the world, including the World Council of Churches, and directed to the governments, UN entities, civil society, and all stakeholders of the Stockholm+50” processes.

Creation justice focus of hybrid event at Stockholm +50

The World Council of Churches and International Partnership on Religion and Sustainable Development (PaRD) are co-hosting a hybrid event on 2 June at Stockholm+50. Exploring the theme Climate Action and Water for Life towards Creation Justice!” the event will reflect on the current scenario of the climate emergency and global water crisis which are interconnected and impact each other as well as the sustainability of the earth. 

WCC Eco-School 2022 postponed to November 2022

Applications are still open for the fifth edition of the World Council of Churches (WCC) Eco-School on Water, Food and Climate Justice. The new dates are 20-26 November 2022.  Convening in-person at the Stony Point Center in New York, the event is open to young people under 30 years of age from the North America region only. 

Webinar explores how women navigate nexus of water, food and climate change

Held in conjunction with the 66th session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, a World Council of Churches’ (WCC) webinar explored how women are navigating the water, food, and climate change nexus. Panellists and participants shared women-led and gender-just responses to the climate crisis as well as the role of churches and faith-based organisations.

Applications open for WCC Eco-School 2022 with focus on North America

Applications are open for the fifth edition of the World Council of Churches (WCC) Eco-School on Water, Food and Climate Justice, to be held 24 April-1 May 2022 in the North America region. Convening in-person at the Stony Point Center in New York, the event is open to young people under 30 years of age from the North America region only. 

Reflecting on California groundwater abuse

I live in western Oregon, part of the Pacific Northwest long regarded as a verdant paradise, courtesy of rains and snowfall that can exceed 100 inches each year.  The snowfall in the mountains sustains our rivers through the dry summer.  But our climate has been profoundly disrupted.  Where I live, summers are far drier and hot.  But just to the south of us, this climate change has caused a drought worse than any drought in the past 1200 years.  Scientists call it a “mega-drought,” a severe drought affecting massive areas of the western United States for more than two decades.  

WCC invites webinar on ’Racism, Land and Food’

The World Council of Churches (WCC) invites a webinar on ’Racism, Land and Food’ to explore the intersections of food, land, and racial injustices, and discern ways to overcome the impact of racial injustice and inequity on food sovereignty.

Protecting Ethiopia’s church forests

In many parts of Ethiopia, the forests surrounding churches and monasteries are among the last remaining in the country. They are severely threatened as people cut trees to obtain firewood. The church fights for the preservation of the forests by making local communities more aware of the link between the forests and water availability and by helping them to find alternative livelihoods for themselves and their families.

Climate crisis fuels existing water injustice

2021 has shown how vulnerable and unprepared even wealthy, industrialized countries are in the face of the escalating climate crisis. Devastating flooding, unprecedented heat waves and out-of-control wildfires have hit parts of Europe and North America. Yet this is just a foretaste of catastrophes that have long since become a bitter reality in other parts of the world. They are almost always a matter of too much or too little water. Yet water problems are often the result of discrimination and political failure, especially in times of climate change.