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Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 5: "Water on Wall Street: the ultimate abuse of God’s gift", by Susan Smith and Dinesh Suna

The 5th reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the WCC’s Ecumenical Water Network (EWN) is written by Susan Smith and Dinesh Suna.*  In the following reflection, they condemn the recent listing of water on Wall Street as a tradable commodity.  Referring to the biblical assurance that God will quench the thirst of the poor and needy and that water should be made available to all even if they have no money, they proclaim the true value of water as a gift from God, a human right, a spiritual wonder and the source of all life. 

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 4: "Gendered water: women fight for safe drinking water in their communities", by Krystina White

The 4th reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the WCC Ecumenical Water Network is written by Krystina White.* In the following reflection, she narrates her experience of how people of colour are denied their right to clean water because of lead poisoning of tap water in Flint, Michigan (USA). She further demonstrates how ordinary women, though at the receiving end, can do extraordinary work, just like Deborah, the prophetess in the Bible.  White and her friends challenged the lead contamination of Flint’s waters through the Black Millennials 4 Flint and offered lasting solutions to communities facing the crisis.

 

"USA: Race and income determine access to clean water" - interview with Michele Roberts

The Environmental Justice Health Alliance for Chemical Policy Reform (EJHA) in the USA is dedicated to chemical safety and supporting healthy, toxic-free communities where people can safely live, work, play, pray and go to school. The alliance is rooted in the history of the environmental and economic justice movement. WCC-EWN talked to Michele Roberts of the Environmental Justice Health Alliance (EJHA) about challenges to safe drinking water in the USA, how these are closely related to systemic racism, and possible solutions to achieve water justice for all.

WCC Programmes

Address by Prof Dr Isabel Apawo Phiri at the closing ceremony of Eco-School 2020/21 for the Pacific (26 February 2021)

Dear Sisters and Brothers,

I had addressed you less than a week ago at the opening of the WCC Eco School 2020-2021 on Sunday evening, Geneva time. And here I am addressing you at the closing. The past 5 days have passed very quickly.  I have been updated by my colleagues responsible for the Eco School that this was an unique experience for all of them and I am sure for you as well. Carrying out a training programme for 5 consecutive days beyond midnight was new for most of them.  But I gather it has been a very enriching experience for them journeying with you all imparting this important training and at the same time listening to your valuable comments, questions and feedback.  But as I said in the opening, despite the geographic and time divide, we are united together virtually for a common cause  -  and that it eco justice! 

WCC Programmes

Address by Prof Dr Isabel Apawo Phiri at the opening ceremony of Eco-School - Pacific (22 February 2021)

Dear Sisters and Brothers,

We are deeply privileged to conduct this Eco- School with all of you, with the youth from 5 different nations, in Fiji, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Tonga and Vanuatu. We are truly blessed to join you, the Pacific youth, along with the global ecumenical family and partners for this opening ceremony. We are holding hands virtually, bridging the oceans, the geographic and time divide, and the disruptions caused by the COVID 19 pandemic. We thank you, the Pacific youth, for your time and commitment.

WCC Programmes

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 3: "Water for creation: protecting water for the sacred C’iyaal, C’waam and Koptu", by Jesse Cruz Richards

The 3rd reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the World Council of Churches (WCC) Ecumenical Water Network is written by Jesse Cruz Richards.*  The following reflection draws inspiration from the restoration of the Israelites from Babylonian exile as promised by Ezekiel, and from hopes and prayers for the restoration of the Klamath Tribes and other indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest to their rivers, waters and fishes, namely the C’iyaal, C’waam and Koptu. 

Reflections on water

Year after year, people of faith, theologians, philosophers, environmentalists, and people from church-related grassroots organizations, as part of the WCC-EWN’s Seven Weeks for Water Lenten campaign, try to capture what is happening in their region regarding water. The editors talked to different members of the WCC-EWN about what the Seven Weeks for Water mean to them and why spiritual reflection is important as we strive for the responsible management and equitable distribution of water for all.

WCC Programmes

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 2: "Water for life: not guaranteed for the indigenous people of the Navajo Nation", by Annika Harley

The 2nd reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the WCC Ecumenical Water Network is written by Annika Harley.*  In the following reflection, Harley highlights the challenges of mining and fracking in the Navajo Nation based on her conversation with Bitahnii Wayne Wilson, who not only challenges these unsustainable practices, but also provides small-scale solutions to indigenous communities in the time of COVID-19.

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, week 1: "The rainbow color of the pilgrimage of water justice in North America", by Michele Roberts

The 1st reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2021 of the WCC Ecumenical Water Network is written by Michele Roberts*, from the Environmental Justice Health Alliance. In this reflection, the author, based on several instances of large scale water contamination in many cities in the USA, comes to a conclusion that lack of access to clean water in USA is a result of systemic racism.