World Council of Churches

A worldwide fellowship of churches seeking unity, a common witness and Christian service

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Nuclear arms control

Advocating at various levels of national and international governance for nuclear disarmament
Nuclear arms control

Nine years after the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japanese Christians presented a peace petition at the WCC assembly in Evanston, United States, 1954. The Assembly appealed to governments of the world to prohibit all weapons of mass destruction and to abstain from aggression.

Churches engaged for nuclear arms control

The WCC raises ecumenical concerns and advocates at various levels of national and international governance for nuclear disarmament, control of the spread of other weapons of mass destruction, and accountability under the international rule of law, and fulfilment of treaty obligations.

Over the coming period, the Council's nuclear disarmament advocacy will focus on the Middle East and Asia; it includes collaboration with the Vatican, other faiths and civil society groups.

It urges churches to follow up on the Ninth Assembly Minute on Nuclear Arms and the Tenth Assembly Statement on the Way of Just Peace with their governments, and supports them with advocacy letters, background information and study materials.

Participating churches and councils receive advice and develop new contacts to support regional, national, local or civil society actions, including inter-religious initiatives.

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