World Council of Churches

A worldwide fellowship of churches seeking unity, a common witness and Christian service

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Migration and social justice

The WCC supports churches' networking and advocacy with uprooted people, and their efforts to explore the links between migration, racism and interfaith relations.
Migration and social justice

A make-shift church in "The Jungle" camp near Calais, France. Photo: Sean Hawkey/WCC

While migration has always been a fact of life, it raises new economic, political, cultural and ecclesial concerns in today's globalized world. New forms of migration, including trafficking and development-induced displacement, threaten the human dignity of millions of people. Xenophobia is increasing.

Migration in a globalized world raises questions about inter-faith relations, identity, justice, racism, advocacy and diakonia. The World Council of Churches seeks to engage and challenge the churches in their work with migrants, including refugees, internally displaced people and victims of trafficking. As the connections between xenophobia and racism are particularly strong, it emphasizes understanding new migration phenomena in a framework of transformative justice, which grew out of the WCC's work on overcoming racism.

Related Events

2018 Ecumenical School on Governance, Economics and Management (GEM) for an Economy of Life

2018 Ecumenical School on Governance, Economics and Management (GEM) for an Economy of Life

19 - 31 August 2018 Mexico City, Mexico

In order to strengthen the voice of the churches with regards to global economics, a group of 18 current and future leaders representing the churches will have the opportunity to attend the Ecumenical School on Governance, Economics and Management (GEM) for an Economy of Life in Mexico City, Mexico from 19-31 August 2018.

World  conference on xenophobia, racism, and populist nationalism  in the context of global migration

World conference on xenophobia, racism, and populist nationalism in the context of global migration

18 - 20 September 2018 Ergife Palace Hotel, via Aurelia 619, Rome, Italy

Convinced of the pivotal role that the churches can play in the task of promoting a just and peaceful human society, the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development and the World Council of Churches in collaboration with the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, undertake to host a world conference that brings together governmental, intergovernmental, civil society, academic, religious, and ecumenical leaders and actors from around the globe to reflect and together seek cohesive and realistic responses to the phenomenon of increasing xenophobia [xénos/stranger+phóbos/fear], racism, and populist nationalism in political and social responses to migrants and refugees. The conference is committed to inclusive participation and to hearing the voices of migrants and refugees themselves.

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