World Council of Churches

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Ecumenical HIV and AIDS Initiatives and Advocacy (EHAIA)

Churches can be a force for transformation - bringing healing, hope and accompaniment to all people affected by HIV. EHAIA promotes HIV competence among churches and theological institutions.

Churches are influential institutions because they are deeply rooted in communities in many parts of the world. They can be a force for transformation - bringing healing, hope and accompaniment to all people affected by HIV.

EHAIA promotes HIV competence among churches and works with theological institutions to integrate and mainstream HIV into theological curricula as well as addressing the root causes of the pandemic.

The AIDS Crisis challenges us profoundly to be the Church in deed and in truth: to be the Church as a healing community.
(WCC Executive Committee, 1986)

EHAIA intentionally involves people living with HIV, people with disabilities, adolescents, youth, women, men, grandparents, sex workers, injecting drug users, prisoners, migrants, sexual minorities and other marginalized groups and ensures that church leaders and theologians engage all those who are usually excluded.

Launched in 2002 as the Ecumenical HIV and AIDS Initiative in Africa, in response to a call from Christians and churches in Africa to the ecumenical fellowship to journey with them in overcoming the HIV pandemic, EHAIA has demonstrated the need of linking grassroots, national and regional actors with international decision and policy-makers.

At the WCC 10th Assembly, EHAIA was given the mandate to expand beyond Africa and become active in Jamaica, Philippines and Ukraine, countries where churches have requested that EHAIA shares its African experiences and expertise.

Read more (pdf, 300 KB) ¦ Overview of related documents ¦ Contacts

Videos

A series of videos filmed by the Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance in cooperation with the World YWCA and EHAIA.

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