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Twenty-five new ecumenical accompaniers, including a Hindu and a Muslim, get to work

Twenty-five new ecumenical accompaniers, including a Hindu and a Muslim, get to work

An ecumenical observer looks on as an ambulance is stopped at Beit Jala

20 October 2006

A new group of 25 ecumenical accompaniers have just begun three months of working with the Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel (EAPPI). The group includes the first Hindu and the second Muslim to participate in the programme, the former from South Africa and the latter from the UK.

The group comprises 15 women and 10 men from eight countries (Germany, Finland, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, UK and USA). The new arrivals bring the total number of accompaniers to have participated in the programme to 329.

The accompaniers will be based in six areas: Bethlehem, Hebron, Jayyous, Tulkarem, Yanoun and Jerusalem; the Jayyous position has just been re-opened.

Ecumenical accompaniers, who serve a minimum of three months, work in various capacities with local churches, Palestinian and Israeli NGOs, as well as Palestinian communities to try to reduce the brutality of the Israeli occupation and improve the daily lives of both peoples.

More information on the EAPPI and profiles of the current group of ecumenical accompaniers are available on the EAPPI website

Media contact in Palestine/Israel:

+972-(0)-2-628-9402 +972-(0)-54-737-9766 eappi-co@jrol.com

The Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel (EAPPI) was launched in August 2002. Ecumenical accompaniers monitor and report violations of human rights and international humanitarian law, support acts of non-violent resistance alongside local Christian and Muslim Palestinians and Israeli peace activists, offer protection through non-violent presence, engage in public policy advocacy, and stand in solidarity with the churches and all those struggling against the occupation. The programme is co-ordinated by the World Council of Churches.