World Council of Churches

A worldwide fellowship of churches seeking unity, a common witness and Christian service

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Churches overcoming racism

WCC work on overcoming racism focuses on the theological and ecclesial challenges faced by the churches in dealing with racism in their midst
Churches overcoming racism

At the conference "Churches against Racism", 2009. © Jaap de Jager/Kerk in Actie

Overcoming racism and the need to focus attention on the life and dignity of its victims has been a major concern for the World Council of Churches over several decades. Regrettably, new forms of racism constantly emerge and racial violence is on the rise.

The WCC challenges the churches to address racism in their own structures and life, and draws on their work and experience in this struggle.

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