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Mission from the margins

As an expression of its commitment to justice, human dignity and liberation the WCC, since its inception, has been a reliable partner of discriminated and excluded people in their struggles. This is a theological activity with people who are exposed to racism, indigenous peoples, migrants, Dalits and people with disabilities.
Mission from the margins

"Reasoning" workshop led by Aymara Indigenous People at the International Ecumenical Peace Convocation

As an expression of its commitment to justice, human dignity and liberation the WCC, since its inception, has been a reliable partner of discriminated and excluded people - racial and ethnic minorities, refugees and migrants, Indigenous Peoples, Dalits, people with disabilities and others - in their struggles. For decades, it has facilitated shared reflection and analysis, advocacy and communication among them. It has supported their efforts at local, national and international levels, encouraging churches and societies to be more just, responsive and inclusive.

Although the globalized world claims to connect people, various forms of exclusion both old and new seem to be actively at work. Some find their way into the life of the churches and influence how churches respond to difference and to various forms of exclusion. With large-scale migration of people all over the world, xenophobia and racial violence are on the increase. The struggle of Indigenous Peoples for land, identity, language and cultural survival continues, as does the struggle for the elimination of the centuries-old discrimination on the basis of caste in India. New challenges have arisen for the people with disabilities in the context of economic globalization and pervasive violence.

Churches can learn from the experiences of advocacy by and on behalf of people who experience discrimination and exclusion.

Mission from the margins is a theological activity with people who are exposed to racism, Indigenous Peoples, migrants, Dalits and people with disabilities. They are not outsiders. All belong to the body of Christ, are part of the church. The WCC facilitates theological reflection based on their experience and visions of world, with the hope that their contributions may help the churches to transform themselves into sanctuaries of love, justice and peace.

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