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Programme plans 2007-2013 - Summary

06 September 2006

Programme summary with projects outline 2007-2009

Draft 14 July 2006

"Churches together to transform the world"

The context of this document:

This document presents plans that are being proposed to the WCC Central Committee in September 2006 for consideration and approval.

Figures for 2007 are budget figures. Figures for 2008 and 2009 represent a framewowrk budget of implementation costs.

This document provides an outline of proposed programmes and projects. Detailed descriptions of projects and activities, including budgets, are now available on www.ecuspace.net

The theme of the WCC's 9th Assembly - "God in your grace, transform the world" - calls churches and individual Christians to acknowledge that it is by God's grace that transformation occurs. This was the inspiration that we carried away with us from the assembly in Porto Alegre. It has been the challenge that undergirds all the work of the WCC, and it is at the heart of these plans. The assembly theme reminds us that the process of discerning God's will for the WCC's future work requires faith in God's grace and belief in the potential for transformation.

The process of interpreting the 9th Assembly and discerning the Council's future programmatic work is complex, yet leadership and staff have been carrying it out in a spirit of openness to the Holy Spirit and to each other. After a detailed assessment of the assembly, we began an intensively creative process of understanding, interpreting and putting into practice the assembly's policy decisions. We then converted this mandate from the assembly into seven-year programme goals with a three-year rolling plan for the work. Staff have been involved in mixed staff groups (breaking away from their present teams' interests) in the reflection process and in designing this next phase in the life of the World Council of Churches and its member churches.

We have shared draft planning documents with a small consultation of representatives from the wider constituency that included Christian world communions, regional ecumenical organizations, ecumenical youth organizations, specialized ministries and member churches. I was grateful for the additional, informal opportunity to share the proposals, for comments, with the APRODEV agencies when they were meeting in the Netherlands. We also received inputs from the US member churches and partners at the meeting of the US Conference in May. All these meetings were consultative in nature and offered some valuable insights, and the texts have subsequently been redrafted in the form presented here.

A revision of the plan was shared with the Executive Committee of the WCC at their meeting in May 2006. They endorsed the programmes contained in this summary document, made their own comments and asked for further refinement of the text. In its draft form it was presented to the WCC Round Table of partner agencies, and they too appreciated the general directions of the plans and gave some valuable suggestions in the process as it continues. Final decisions regarding these proposals and an organizational structure to accompany them will need to be taken by you at the meeting of the Central Committee in September 2006.

I am happy to communicate this proposal to you and invite the member churches to accompany this work that will contribute to the transformation of the churches and the world.

Rev. Dr. Samuel Kobia

General Secretary

World Council of Churches

July 2006

Each assembly of the World Council of Churches brings with it new inspiration and new challenges related to the quest for the visible unity of the churches and common ecumenical action for peace and justice in our world. The assembly also offers an opportunity to receive reports, to evaluate past work and to give indications of the way forward. It offers guidelines to frame the work, as it offers a space for the churches to recommit themselves to common and ecumenical action through the programmes of the WCC. We have in the past months attempted to interpret assembly decisions and to transform ideas into programmatic plans for the next seven years.

The priorities identified

Priorities for the WCC are reflected in the major programmes described here. The cycle of work is defined in terms of accompanying the churches and preparing together to fulfill our ecumenical commitments to each other as we journey towards the 10th Assembly. At the 9th Assembly, the churches recognized a new and enhanced role for the World Council of Churches as a repository of the ecumenical vision and an instrument of the ecumenical movement in the 21st century providing coherence to the movement as a whole.

These priorities assume that the quest for visible unity remains the primary ecumenical task of the churches as they engage each other and act together. In the present time, the mission of the churches needs to be redirected to address the challenges of fragmentation, dis-harmony and the many threats these pose to unity. There is also a new spiritual quest among WCC member churches and in society at large. The ecumenical implications of these dynamics need to be addressed by the churches.

Holding unity and mission together presents a creative challenge as the WCC tries to discern the ways in which it will work with the churches, partners and mission agencies to determine the mission priorities for the ecumenical movement and the churches in the 21st Century. At the heart of the calling of the WCC, one finds the imperative to bear witness in the world to the gospel message of compassion and justice. The need to address Christian self-identity in the midst of many religions has been a priority clearly identified by the WCC, and this calls for more programmatic cooperation between the areas of mission and inter-religious dialogue and cooperation. The church as a healing community, and as a HIV-AIDS competent church, is another dimension of the Christian vocation. Demands of the gospel are addressed to the churches themselves as they reflect: on racism and its impact on mission as we commemorate the 200th anniversary of the legal end of slavery; on human rights of minorities, including Christian minorities; on people with disabilities and their call for a "church for all"; and on the struggles of Indigenous Peoples and Dalits and their quest for dignity and just relationships within the life of the churches and in society. We also reflect through these plans on the changing ecclesial context because of migration and the vitality and dynamism that new migrant church communities bring to the mainline churches. By focusing attention on these mission priorities, it is hoped to feed into and impact the preparatory process for the Edinburgh 2010 World Mission Conference.

Additionally, world conditions demand a moral and ethical public witness in response to the way power manifests itself, as well as to the many inequalities in economic, political, social and cultural spheres. The churches are called not only to hold the powerful accountable, but to address those in power who fail to serve people and the entire web of life. The churches are called to be a voice for the voiceless, the voice of those excluded from the benefits of development and justice, the voice of those experiencing human rights abuses, the poor, the racially oppressed, the disabled, children, women, youth and Indigenous Peoples. Violence and conflict in our world, and the necessity of churches' witness to peace, require a renewal of our commitment and energy in support of the Decade to Overcome Violence, with particular attention to the Middle East region which represents a key to world peace. The commitment to prophetic diakonia together with justice is reaffirmed as the churches respond to the demands posed by ethical issues such as the potential for use and abuse of science and technology, climate change and the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

The churches must stay committed to their ecumenical vocation; therefore, ecumenical and faith formation becomes a primary concern. This concern relates equally to the commitment to play a role in building an atmosphere of trust with people of other faiths so as to focus much more on cooperation than merely on dialogue alone.

These priorities were defined as we began the planning process, following the guidance given by the assembly. Before going into the actual plans, we wish to highlight several aspects of what is new in the documents that follow.

New processes and tools

The planning process itself has been accomplished differently, through the interactive process described in the Foreword. Such an intensively consultative planning process has never before been undertaken by the WCC.

It is proposed that the projects and activities that will be approved by the Central Committee be implemented by flexible staff groups drawn from various parts of the WCC, to ensure a truly integrated and interactive model for work that holds together mission and unity, public witness and action on economics, diakonia and justice, ecumenical formation and the Bossey Ecumenical Institute - all harmonized in a more intentional way.

Every programme has built into it a relational component, a communications plan and a plan for good stewardship of staff and resources. A key feature of the new programme proposal is the creation of a global platform for theological reflections and analysis of all work. Another new venture is an Ecumenical Solidarity Fund to bring together all funding instruments in the WCC. The fund is to be managed and monitored centrally by a small staff group from various programmes, so as to have a more coordinated and strategic approach in supporting ecumenical initiatives.

There are new activities or new phases in ongoing work of the WCC. Some examples:

  • a new focus on spirituality;

  • a programme on faith, science and technology;

  • an initiative to build new synergies around the commitment to eradicate poverty and confront wealth creation at the cost of the earth;

  • a recommitment to address the scandal of the spread of HIV/AIDS, with a focus on the churches in all regions and breaking the stigma within the churches;

  • a focus on the Middle East to develop a policy of common action in the region;

  • a paradigm shift in inter-religious dialogue, with more attention to cooperation and real-life struggles of communities living in tension and persecution;

  • a new focus on youth and establishment of a "youth body" at the governing body level to monitor all the work and to advise the WCC on how best to integrate youth into all the work of the WCC;

  • a strengthened office on Planning, Monitoring, Evaluating and Reporting to work within the general secretariat.

Here, it is important to highlight specifically the way this proposal responds to the Assembly mandate to work with youth. Placing the coordinating of all youth initiatives in the context of nurturing relationships with member churches is a way of emphasizing the centrality of the role of the WCC in advocating for the full participation of youth in all areas of the work of the WCC. Young adults are seen as making a significant contribution to the common understanding and vision discussion, and to the process on ecumenism in the 21st century, and to the Council's work on ecclesiology and unity. Young people will contribute significantly to progress on human rights, to discussions of economic globalization of faith, science and technology. Ecumenical formation opportunities and their contributions to interfaith living are topics that young people have influenced from the beginning. The formation of a "youth body" will be a think tank that creatively strengthens the ecumenical vision of the WCC and will offer young men and women a monitoring role within the structure of the institution.

Interpreting the WCC's specific role?

The assembly has instructed us to focus on programmes where the WCC is uniquely placed to act, and on the manner in which each proposed programme shall fulfill aspects of that role. We have understood this in several ways.

  • The WCC is the most inclusive global Christian organization, bringing together churches and ecumenical partners.

  • The WCC has a tremendous potential in mobilizing a large spectrum of member churches and is an organization trusted by member churches. Today we have clear indications that churches who left membership are considering decisions to come back.

  • The WCC is at the heart of a wide network of people and organizations, creating space for ecumenical partner organizations, acting beyond the narrow borders of its own institutional interests.

  • The WCC can serve as a catalyst and mediator in situations where member churches are facing church-dividing issues.

  • The WCC has succeeded in inspiring its member churches and ecumenical partners with new and exciting ways of functioning, such as the consensus decision-making process.

  • The WCC can initiate a genuine dialogue bringing together parties who represent opposing positions on difficult questions such as economic globalization. The WCC can assist member churches and partners in moving from a confrontational attitude towards constructive dialogue and common action.

  • The WCC, because of its long and competent history in relating with people of other faiths, can work with them to explore and transform the role religion plays today in public life.

The vision of the WCC's coherent programmatic work, 2007-2013

In addition to the recommendations from the 9th Assembly, the vision for the WCC's future programmatic work is grounded in the WCC Constitution and the Common Understanding and Vision (CUV) process.

The Constitution

The assembly reaffirmed the stated purpose and functions of the WCC as expressed in the Constitution (para. III) as the basis for its work.

The primary purpose of the fellowship of churches in the World Council of Churches is to call one another to visible unity in one faith and one eucharistic fellowship, expressed in worship and common life in Christ, through witness and service to the world, and to advance towards that unity in order that the world may believe.

In addition, that paragraph affirms as goals of the Council the commitments to:

  • promote the prayerful search for forgiveness and reconciliation in a spirit of mutual accountability, the development of deeper relationships through theological dialogue and the sharing of human, spiritual and material resources with one another;

  • facilitate common witness; express their commitment to diakonia in serving human need;

  • nurture the growth of an ecumenical consciousness;

  • assist each other in relationships to and with people of other faiths; and

  • foster renewal and growth through unity, worship, mission and service.

The 9th Assembly

As the highest governing body of the World Council of Churches, the assembly set the directions for WCC's programmatic work until the next assembly. The assembly's committees did not work in a vacuum but sought to incorporate insights from the reports of the moderator and general secretary, the plenary presentations, the Latin American context, the Ecumenical Conversations, the Mutirão, the worship life of the assembly, the pre-assembly meetings - all of which contributed to the spirit and inspiration of the Porto Alegre assembly.

New ways of working

1. An integrated and interactive approach

The 9th Assembly "instructs the General Secretary, in consultation with the Central Committee, to implement clear and consistent changes to the working style, organizational structure and staffing of the WCC necessary to meet the current and future challenges to the ecumenical movement. The Policy Reference Committee is particularly interested in ensuring that all programmes, consultations, visits or statements initiated by the WCC are integrated and coordinated with the work being undertaken by staff in other programmes."

We have addressed how WCC programmes are to be implemented in an integrated fashion, how to ensure coherence in diverse programmatic work, and how to integrate the nurturing of relationships in all programmatic work.

2. Mechanisms for planning, monitoring, evaluation and reporting

The Finance Committee called on the WCC to "implement a programme planning, monitoring, evaluation, and reporting process led by the staff leadership group, permeating the working culture and including the assignment of a professional coordinator, the development of database programme management tools and general staff training". This is now being implemented.

The Programme Guidelines Committee also identified methodological elements, including:

  • articulating a clear theological basis for all the work in the WCC;

  • facilitating the coordinating role of the WCC in seeking partnerships in networking and advocacy with other organizations - with the hope that many of these programmes can be implemented in collaborative ways;

  • encouraging capacity-building of member churches and ecumenical partners;

  • accompanying churches and peoples in critical situations and facilitating their action.

In looking to its task of shaping future programmes for the WCC, the 9th Assembly approved the following process:

  • clear, well-functioning planning, monitoring and evaluation mechanisms be established for each programme;

  • a clear distinction be made between long-term, time-bound or specific urgent issues;

  • a two-way communication strategy be developed for each programme and carried out with various constituencies;

  • clear exit strategies be established in phasing out, reconfiguring or reshaping;

  • sustained dialogue with member churches and specialized ministries regarding ways of generating additional financial support to programmatic work of the WCC.

3. Setting programme priorities

The PGC identified seven basic principles to guide the WCC in setting its programme priorities in the future:

  • to keep its focus upon what the WCC can only do as a global fellowship of churches in providing leadership to the whole of the ecumenical movement;

  • to do less, to do it well, in an integrated, collaborative and interactive approach;

  • to lift up its central task of the churches calling one another to visible unity;

  • to keep in tension the work of dialogue and advocacy, of building relationships and promoting social witness among churches and with different sectors in society;

  • to foster greater ownership and participation of the churches in building as much as possible on initiatives of the churches and partner organizations;

  • to bring a prophetic voice and witness to the world in addressing the urgent and turbulent issues of our times in a focused way.

It has been decided to focus on six programmes only and to limit the number of projects and activities to ensure that we do less and do it better. What is not obvious in the text before you is the proposal to work in flexible and integrated staff groups and in more collaborative ways with churches and ecumenical partners - this also will demonstrate the commitment to do less and do it better. We have been unable to list these partners specifically, as this requires negotiation and dialogue before the collaboration can be listed.

4. Focus on a communications plan

The proposal to have a Council-wide communications plan is highlighted. So as to avoid seeing communications as an add-on to the programme plans, we have challenged colleagues to work on a communications plan as they designed the projects. We also had a staff team, with communications experts from outside the WCC, to advise us on this. A strengthened and more effective communications team is now proposed here, to be headed by a person who will work closely with the General Secretary in preparing for and enabling a strong ethical and moral response to world issues and in making known the programmatic work of the WCC. 

 

The programme structure

Fundamental commitments of the WCC have been converted into six programmes. These represent main impulses that will sustain the activity of the WCC up to the next assembly. The objective of each programme is to achieve goals which represent a seven-year process from one assembly to the next. Each goal is associated with criteria for achievement, which will be monitored over the three-year rolling cycle of work and will allow for evaluation at the end of the period to ascertain the extent to which it has been fulfilled.

A goal will be met through the implementation of projects that support the process. The projects are time-bound within 2007-2009 and provide specific results. A project is a set of activities that have been grouped together in an integrated process for coherence. One project could eventually contribute to various goals from various programmes, and will be implemented by a core group of staff from one programme with participation of staff from other programmes. A project includes a specific objective, a time schedule, a methodology, a set of activities and time-defined and tangible results of the activities.

Programmes: with goals and criteria for achievement for the next seven years

Projects: three-year rolling cycle with list of activities

Activities: three-year list, one-year detailed plan and budget

This document provides an overview of programmes and projects. Detailed descriptions of projects and activities, including budgets, are also available on www.ecuspace.net

PROGRAMMES

Background

The World Council of Churches is called to work for the visible unity of the church (John 17:21). The WCC is a fellowship of some 350 Anglican, Eastern and Oriental Orthodox, Old Catholic, Protestant, independent and united churches, and is an important instrument of the entire ecumenical movement. In its vocation to serve both the member churches and the ecumenical movement, the WCC responds to new challenges brought by changing times, renews and strengthens relationships with its partners, and emphasizes the need for growing discernment of the ecumenical calling.

Through the initiatives of the WCC, its member churches and a broad range of ecumenical partners pray, reflect, plan and act together. They seek together to discern the promises and the challenges of the times. They open themselves to a culture of dialogue, cooperation and solidarity. They work together for the healing of human community. Together they become agents of that renewal and transformation which has characterized the ecumenical movement from its beginnings. All these presuppose nurturing relationships with and among churches, including those who are not yet members of the WCC; establishing and maintaining relationships with Christian world communions, conciliar bodies and other ecumenical agencies; supporting ecumenical initiatives at regional, national and local levels; working towards maintaining the coherence of the one ecumenical movement in its diverse manifestations.

There are three major facets of this programme: (1) the WCC's contribution to developing a theological platform for common reflection on issues on the ecumenical agenda; (2) the WCC's leading role in coordinating joint efforts to unfold the challenges of ecumenism in the 21st century and their consequences for the vision, activities and structures of ecumenical organizations and partners; (3) the WCC's commitment to play a coordinating role in the participation and contributions of women and youth, placed within this programme to ensure that these constituencies will be overarching and Council-wide concerns.

The projects presented in this chapter should not be seen as related purely to one "programme", but rather as the common foundation for all the activities, clarifying their vision, affirming their raison d'être and setting their broader framework.

Goals and criteria for achievement

Goal 1a: The WCC has responded to its commitments to visible church unity and to being a fellowship of churches.

  • The WCC has enabled interpretation and appropriation of the Common Understanding and Vision (CUV) process, as the vision that is the basis of its fellowship. (Project P101)
  • The WCC has facilitated the strengthening of relationships and the mutual accountability between its member churches as an expression of their commitment to the fellowship and to the visible unity of the church. (Project P103)
  • The WCC has provided a coordinated approach to the concerns of women and youth and has facilitated their presence and contributions to the ecumenical movement. (Project P105)
  • The WCC has strengthened its relations with ecumenical partners and non-member churches. (Project P104)

Goal 1b: The WCC has provided a firm theological grounding and focus for all its programmes and has facilitated theological reflection on major cutting-edge issues.

  • All WCC programmes are theologically grounded. (All projects.)
  • WCC has provided an effective platform for providing opportunities for dialogue on and analysis of issues of major concern to the life of the churches. (Project P102)

Projects 2007-2009

P101   Interpretation of the ecumenical vision of the WCC

The adoption of the Policy Statement "Towards a Common Understanding and Vision of the WCC" at the Harare Assembly (1998), opened a new avenue encouraging churches to evaluate their ecumenical commitment - in their own local contexts, in their national, regional and global relationships and, specifically, in relation to the WCC. Two foci emerged out of the commitment to broadening the ecumenical movement: first, the ecumenical movement is wider than the WCC's organizational expressions, and second the Council serves this wider ecumenical movement as one of its most important instruments.

The CUV influenced two key ecumenical processes: the Special Commission on Orthodox Participation in the WCC, and the process named "Ecumenism in the 21st century", the latter relating to how ecumenical partners reflect on the reconfiguration of the ecumenical movement. Continuing to pursue the potential of these two processes is vital.

Interpreting and communicating the spirit of the "Common Understanding and Vision" process will constitute the main objective of this project.

P102   Global platform for theology and analysis

As a world-wide instrument of Christian unity, the WCC is mandated to facilitate common theological reflections on and analysis of certain crucial issues that concern the life, work and relationships among churches, Christian world communions and ecumenical partners working in different fields. The WCC will facilitate this global platform, by bringing together a wide range of church leaders, theologians, ethicists, social scientists and activists from many parts of the world to analyze, interpret and forecast the implications of these challenges to Christian witness in the world today, to the ecumenical movement and to the churches. The issues for study and reflection will be determined through a consultative process ensuring space for many perspectives. There will be intentional efforts to ensure substantial youth contributions to the process.

P103   Nurturing relationships with member churches

The WCC provides a space in which the member churches explore and experience together what it means to be in fellowship. This fellowship is a dynamic, relational reality embracing the fullness of the churches and the entire life and work of the WCC. To strengthen and deepen the fellowship of its member churches, the WCC seeks to maximize the participation and representation of churches in its life and activities through its governing bodies and in its on-going programmatic work.

The WCC affirms the centrality of the ecumenical vision in the life of the member churches and promotes reflection and concrete experiences on what it means to belong to the fellowship. Strengthening relationships with member churches will constitute the primary objective of this project, while relationships with member churches, as the very foundation for all the work of WCC, will constitute an integral part of all programmatic activities of the Council.

P104   Partnership with ecumenical organizations

In seeking to ensure the coherence of the ecumenical movement, the WCC works to develop effective and mutually enriching partnerships with a range of ecumenical organizations. In particular, it recognizes the specific role and important contributions of regional ecumenical organizations, national councils of churches, specialized ministries, international ecumenical organizations and Christian world communions. Additionally it coordinates WCC's relationships with non-member churches and facilitates the Joint Working Group between the WCC and the Roman Catholic Church (in collaboration with P201), and the Pentecostal and evangelical churches (in collaboration with P203). In the coming years, a specific focus on the "ecumenism in the 21st century" process will be strengthened through substantive discussions with ecumenical organizations on roles, accountability and ways of ensuring that programmatic work and public statements complement each other. Furthering the work of the Forum will also form a part of this work. The WCC's coordinating role in ACT Development is important for coherence to the ecumenical movement in its witness for development (P402).

P105 - Youth and women: challenges and hopes

The WCC facilitates the full and creative participation of youth in all its work. Through this project, the WCC will play a co-ordinating role and will provide possibilities for youth to contribute their visions to permeate all the work of the WCC. The WCC will provide the space for young adults to become more active in the life of the churches and the ecumenical movement. It will facilitate the to-be-formed "youth body" and the involvement of stewards and interns in the life of the WCC. It will also continue to work with local and regional initiatives of ecumenical youth through the world youth programme contributing to the creation of a network of ecumenical youth working in close dialogue and partnership with each other.

The WCC will co-ordinate women's concerns and visions in the ecumenical movement and in the life of the churches and other ecumenical bodies. The WCC has the possibility to bring together women of various Christian traditions, regions of the world and ages into genuine dialogue so as to contribute to the ecumenical vision and in the search for unity. The WCC will continue its long tradition of providing the space for women to challenge the churches on priority concerns that affect the daily life of women. This will be done in close working relationship with other programmes that will engage women on issues such as women and economic justice; violence against women; and women in a religiously plural world. A gender framework will be used as an analytical tool in designing the WCC's role and contribution to other networks working on these issues.  

Financial summary 2007-2009

P1 - WCC and the Ecumenical Movement in the 21st Century

2007

2008

2009

Implementation costs

 

 

 

P101 - Interpretation of the ecumenical vision of the WCC

154,200

100,000

153,000

P102 - Global platform for theology and analysis

89,056

89,000

89,000

P103 - Nurturing relationships with member churches

405,410

1,150,000

1,150,000

P104 - Partnership with ecumenical organizations

134,200

165,000

155,000

P105 - Youth and women: challenges and hopes

630,000

685,000

685,000

Staff and related costs

1,876,292

1,876,292

1,876,292

Total direct costs

3,289,158

4,065,292

4,108,292

Infrastructure costs

783,368

783,368

783,368

Total programme costs

4,072,526

4,848,660

4,891,660

Background

The programme on Unity, Mission and Spirituality addresses issues which are central to the identity, life and witness of the church. It encourages and enables the churches in calling one another to the goal of visible unity, in deepening the spiritual and worship dimensions of their lives, in working together for a more faithful mission in the world, and in fostering the fullest possible participation of those on the periphery of the church, in their witness and work. In all these areas, the programme responds to commitments made and needs identified by the churches at the WCC's 9th Assembly as well as requests by ecumenical partners.

The response and reception process for the ecclesiology text "Called to Be the One Church", adopted by the churches at the WCC 9th Assembly, seeks to renew the search for visible unity as the churches ask one another direct questions: how far do we recognize a common baptism in Christ, and do we draw the full consequences of this recognition for our own lives as churches? The centenary of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity in 2008 will be a call to reaffirm the foundations of the search for unity in prayer and the spiritual life. The centenary of the Edinburgh mission conference in 2010, to which the WCC will make a substantial contribution, will be a moment of renewal for the churches in their understanding and practice of mission and unity. Through work on spirituality and worship, the WCC will help the churches and ecumenical partners deepen their understanding of these fundamental dimensions of the Christian life, as well as providing materials for practical use within the churches and ecumenically. Work on community and inclusion will help ensure that the churches foster a church and community life which is just, participatory and inclusive.

The projects will address issues in an integrated way, recognizing for example the relationship between issues of unity and of mission, or the essential - but complex - role played by spirituality and worship in building just and inclusive communities. The programme will need to engage work done elsewhere within the WCC, for example through the global platform for theological reflection and analysis (P102) and the work on faith, science and technology (P504).

As a global fellowship of churches the WCC is able to bring together ecumenically engaged churches and other partners and to embody, in its own life and work, the diversity of the global Christian family theologically, regionally and culturally. The Faith and Order Commission and the Commission on World Mission and Evangelism establish links to a vast network of member and non-member churches and organizations. Work on spirituality and worship is strengthened by extensive links to the churches' programmes in these fields.

In affirming the inclusive character of the church and society, the assembly called for concerted work with people engaged in overcoming racism, as well as people with disabilities and Indigenous Peoples, and also stressed the need to be more intentional in the work with Dalits in India. The Ecumenical Disabilities Advocates Network was charged with the responsibility to articulate even more boldly and creatively, methods consistent with Christian theology by which to make the churches fully inclusive communities. In calling for a strengthening of the WCC's work with Indigenous Peoples, the assembly considered the opportunities for the ecumenical fellowship to gain new insights on the importance of place, land, language and theology of creation in the life of the churches. These programmes, projects and their related activities will continue to play a prominent role in the ecumenical movement as it prepares for and journeys towards the World Mission Conference to commemorate Edinburgh 1910-2010, in identifying what the mission priorities and challenges are one hundred years after that milestone of modern ecumenism.

Goals and criteria for achievement

Goal 2a: The WCC has held together its commitment both to visible unity and to witnessing to the gospel in a divided and changing world.

  • The WCC has encouraged and accompanied the churches in their theological and ecclesiological reflection, addressing fundamental issues related to the unity of the churches and the continuing sources of division among and within them. (Project P201)

  • The WCC has encouraged its member churches, related mission bodies and study centres to give an account of ecumenical theory and the practice of mission in the contemporary context, with a special emphasis on the interface between ecclesiology and mission. (Project P203)

Goal 2b: WCC churches have discovered in one another resources for deepening their spirituality, and enriching their community life and witness.

  • The WCC has fostered among the churches a deeper appreciation for one another's spiritual and worship traditions, exploring and sharing models of and resources for spirituality and worship, forms of ecclesial life and contextual ways of proclaiming the gospel which foster healing and reconciliation. (Project P202)

Goal 2c: The WCC has encouraged member churches to become more just and inclusive communities where all may participate and contribute fully.

  • The WCC has facilitated member churches holding each other accountable for practices of discrimination and exclusion in church life. Delegations from churches to the 10th Assembly have increased participation of women, youth, people with disabilities, Indigenous People and Dalits and racial/ethnic minorities. (Project P204)

Projects 2007-2009

P201   Called to be the one church

This project serves the churches in their efforts to call one other to visible unity. This is necessary - even after decades of ecumenical advance - because although the church is one in Christ, the churches remain divided too often on fundamental theological and ethical issues, and by memories of past conflicts. Sinful and divisive forces such as racism, ethnicity and national identity also challenge their unity.

This project responds to commitments and mandates approved by churches at the WCC 9th Assembly, as well as to needs identified by long-term ecumenical partners. It focuses on studies, on processes to develop agreed positions and to clarify differences, and on building relationships within the one body of Christ. It offers tools for WCC member and non-member churches, Christian world communions, and united and uniting churches to affirm the bases of their unity, and to address the full range of issues - theological, historical and social - which continue to divide them.

P202   Spirituality and worship in the ecumenical context

This project seeks to encourage churches to explore traditional and newer dimensions of spiritual life in the ecumenical movement. In this project there will be an intentional efforts to learn from the spiritual journeys and life experiences of women and youth and from communities such as Taizé and Iona. Work will also continue on the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity; the development of a spiritual life, worship and healing communities' resources repository; and a series of workshops based on spirituality and how this inspires the churches' common life.

P203   Ecumenical perspectives on mission and unity

The WCC has a long history of engagement in mission and in holding together the commitment to the unity of the church with mission and evangelism. Therefore it is well placed to engage in an international study process on mission, drawing on a wide constituency (including Pentecostals, evangelicals, Orthodox and Roman Catholics) that has been launched in preparation for marking the centennial of the 1910 Edinburgh world mission conference. The WCC, as institutional inheritor of the movement launched at Edinburgh, has been challenged and is ready to take a leading role in the preparations for and the organization of events in 2010. Activities in this project will contribute to sharpening an ecumenical understanding and practice of mission. Special emphasis will be put on the integral relationship between mission and unity, between ecclesiology and mission. The WCC will highlight specific inputs from member churches, related mission bodies and study centres/theological faculties and the network of young missiologists on new developments in an ecumenical understanding and practice of mission. A particular emphasis will be laid on the interface between mission and unity, ecclesiology and mission in the "Towards 2010" study process.

The project has a related aim, namely to strengthen the dialogue and cooperation with Pentecostal and evangelical churches as well as with mission bodies in both "North" and "South", in conjunction with the work of the new Commission on World Mission and Evangelism.

P204 - Just and inclusive communities

This project supports the meaningful input and participation of people who have often experienced exclusion in church communities and society. Through encounters, theological reflection, networking and supporting local ecumenical and global work, the project will work on what contributes to just and inclusive communities. The WCC creates space for people with disabilities, Indigenous Peoples, racially oppressed people, ethnic minorities and Dalits, to bring their leadership and perspectives to the ecumenical movement. WCC's solidarity with people most often on the margins of church and society will strengthen the ecumenical movement by fostering right relationships and social justice among and within churches. Through this activity, member churches are challenged to confront and overcome exclusivity and forms of discrimination, and also to share their own positive examples of church and community life that is just, participatory and inclusive. 

Financial summary 2007-2009 

P2 - Unity, Mission and Spirituality

2007

2008

2009

Implementation costs

 

 

 

P201 - Called to be the one church

166,890

253,000

116,000

P202 - Spirituality and worship in ecumenical context

90,000

137,000

122,000

P203 - Ecumenical perspectives on mission and unity

301,650

203,000

247,000

P204 - Just and inclusive communities

630,000

630,000

630,000

Staff and related costs

1,623,879

1,623,879

1,623,879

Total direct costs

2,812,419

2,846,879

2,738,879

Infrastructure costs

691,207

691,207

691,207

Total programme costs

3,503,626

3,538,086

3,430,086

Background

The present state of flux in the national and international contexts represents a great challenge to the ecumenical movement. The scandal of poverty and exclusion and the ways economic, social, cultural and political power are exercised require concerted and common reflection and action on the part of the churches. As a global fellowship of churches, the WCC expresses an integral dimension of its mission through public voice and prophetic witness in confronting power and affirming peace in all these spheres. This witness addresses urgent concerns for the churches in relationship to peace, security, poverty and justice in the world.

In this phase of its work, the WCC will play a greater coordinating role at the global level and will strengthen its advocacy role through intergovernmental organizations like the UN, the international financial institutions and other intergovernmental organizations like the International Criminal Court. Through these instruments, the WCC will voice the concerns of the churches and the ecumenical movement so as to influence policy decisions on global governance in order to enhance human dignity. The churches' engagement in the struggle for peace and justice at the local and regional levels will be coordinated at the global level. The WCC will continue to develop and implement an ecumenical approach to international issues through analysis and documentation, policy development, advocacy, solidarity campaigns and awareness-raising efforts.

In today's world, the reality of violence, from family life to the international level, has become a major threat which is tackled by the Decade to Overcome Violence: Churches Seeking Reconciliation and Peace (DOV), 2001-2010. Within the framework of the DOV, churches respond ecumenically to different forms of violence in their own contexts. This is an area of concern where inter-religious cooperation is crucial, drawing inspiration from resources for peace that are embedded in all religious traditions. Involvement of children, youth and women as well as collaboration with civil society actors are all essential dimensions of this programme as the churches explore the spirit, logic and practice of violence. This last period of the DOV offers the potential for the churches to speak together and act together for just peace and reconciliation in a world racked by violence, war and conflict at all levels.

A special regional focus for the period will be peace in the Middle East, as a specific case but with global implications. Peace, security and human dignity or commitments to human rights cannot be dealt with in isolation from poverty, wealth and ecology, which will be addressed. The Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel (EAPPI) will be a closely related and integral part of this project.

The WCC's role will be to enhance the work done by churches, regional ecumenical organizations and specialized ministries in this field, cooperating and coordinating their efforts as well as highlighting and deepening the global implications of particular cases. Witness for peace and justice emphasizes one of the contributions of the WCC to the ecumenical formation of the whole ecumenical movement, unfolding a specific dimension of mission which enables prophetic diakonia in a multicultural and globalized world.

Goals and criteria for achievement

Goal 3a: Churches have actively worked together to overcome violence and pursue justice, peace and reconciliation.

  • Representatives from WCC member churches, non-member churches and ecumenical partners have engaged together in a process of articulating a common vision of and commitment to just peace. (Project P301)
  • Churches and the wider ecumenical movement are sharing experiences and give mutual support, interacting together and with civil society actors in overcoming violence. (Project P301)

Goal 3b: The WCC has been an instrument of prophetic witness on critical issues, holding power accountable for a more just and peaceful global community.

  • The WCC, as an instrument of the churches, has succeeded in making its position on critical global issues known and has played an effective and coordinating role in advocacy efforts. (Project P302)
  • The WCC has defended human dignity by addressing human rights from an ethical and theological perspective. (Project P303)
  • The WCC has developed a comprehensive policy on the Middle East and has engaged the churches globally in their prophetic witness for peace in the region. (Project 304)
  • The WCC has strengthened and promoted its programme of accompaniment of the people of Israel and Palestine. (Project P305)

Goal 3c: WCC has engaged churches in critical dialogue and common action on the relationship between poverty, wealth and ecology.

  • The WCC has mobilized churches and ecumenical partners in dialogue and action addressing the link between poverty, wealth and ecology. (Project P306)

Projects 2007-2009

P301   Decade to Overcome Violence (DOV)

It was because of a prophetic call of the 8th Assembly of the WCC in Harare in 1998, that an "Ecumenical Decade to Overcome Violence: Churches Seeking Reconciliation and Peace" was launched in 2001, to end in 2010. During the first half of the Decade, many churches became involved, resources were shared, awareness built and creative actions taken. The wide spectrum and complexity of violence and the challenge to overcome it have become clearer. During the second half (2006-2010), the churches' alliances need to be strengthened, their discernment sharpened, and their concern regarding just peace moved "from the periphery to the centre of the life and witness of the church". The Annual Focus and team visits will constitute a pivotal point for several key activities with significant visibility, such as the International Day of Prayer for Peace (IDPP), training and awareness-building in the specific region, Internet and multimedia events. The DOV will come to an end in 2010/11 with an International Ecumenical Peace Convocation where a "Declaration on Just Peace", which will be discussed and worked on by the churches, will be adopted.

P302 - Global advocacy for justice and accountability

There is an urgent need for churches and ecumenical organizations to raise their voice in a more concerted and coordinated way so as to be heard by governments and intergovernmental organizations like the UN, the International Criminal Court and international financial institutions. The WCC has played an important role in bringing churches and ecumenical organizations and movements together to speak out on critical challenges regarding country situations, regional developments or thematic foci with global implications, from an ethical and theological perspective. In relationship to the UN, the WCC will continue to offer a platform to convey the different concerns of the ecumenical movement both in Geneva and New York. Special emphasis will be placed in the next period on nuclear disarmament, economic justice, Indigenous Peoples' legitimate claims, the International Criminal Court, and regional concerns in relation to the annual DOV focus. The Advocacy Week at the UN in New York will be an annual feature.

P303   Human rights to enhance human dignity

Churches often call on the WCC to accompany them in critical situations to defend human dignity, overcome impunity, achieve accountability and build just and peaceful societies. The WCC's approach addresses civil and political rights, economic, cultural and social rights and the right to development in an integrated way. The promotion and protection of human rights from an ethical and theological perspective includes a close accompaniment of the churches as well as sharing of lessons learned by churches, regional ecumenical organizations, Christian world communions and other ecumenical partners working in these areas in other contexts. Challenges for the coming years include the need to further develop the inter-religious dimension of rights and dignity; focus the work on victims' rights, impunity, religious freedom and liberty and minority rights; as well as provide a space to the churches to discuss the relationship between justice, human rights and human dignity in cooperation with the global platform for theological reflection and analysis (P102).

P304   Churches and the Middle East: solidarity and witness for peace

The Middle East has always been a region of special interest for the WCC, as it is the birthplace of three monotheistic religions and carries the heritage of a great Christian presence. The churches in the region have their roots in apostolic history. Presently they face unprecedented challenges. Inter- and intra-state wars and conflicts are tearing the region apart. Increasing religious extremism, intolerance and religious tensions have compounded the problems and jeopardized the security and stability of the region.

The main problems facing the Middle East today include: Iraq's security dilemma, Iran's nuclear weapons programme, Israel's intransigence, and the potential unrest in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. All these are interlinked together with the question of control of energy resources: 25 percent of the world's oil production comes from the region, with Saudi Arabia alone producing 15 percent. In view of the above, the security problems of the region are likely to become more complicated and challenging.

As a major flash point in the world, the situation of the Middle East calls for collective efforts by ecumenical partners to work for peace and justice at local, national, regional and international levels. WCC is committed to building the capacity of the churches to witness to peacemaking, undertake advocacy work at the local and national levels, and influence policy changes of the major global and regional powers.

P305 - Ecumenical Accompaniment in Palestine and Israel (EAPPI)

This special project's objective is to to protect, express solidarity and develop advocacy actions in relationship to the situation in Palestine and Israel. Ecumenical accompaniers (EAs) are placed in about five local communities or with local Palestinian and Israeli partner organizations.

Through the reports and work of the EAs and their local partners, EAPPI exposes the violence of the occupation and violations of human rights and humanitarian law and advocates for their end. These reports create awareness around the aspirations of the churches and peace groups in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and Israel to the WCC constituency; solicit and encourage more EAPPI partners for advocacy in home countries; and provide information to churches in order for them to influence public opinion in their home countries and affect their foreign policy on the Middle East.

P306   Poverty, wealth and ecology: reflection and action

Economic globalization has not reduced poverty, inequality and ecological destruction. On the contrary, it has led to the destruction of the environment and widened the gap between the rich and the poor. The most affected groups are women, youth, Indigenous Peoples and people with disabilities. The major ecumenical challenge is to relate poverty, wealth and ecology as a concrete way of analyzing, reflecting and acting against economic injustice. However, the assembly in Porto Alegre demonstrated sharply that there are divergent ways to analyze these realities and to act on them. The WCC has the potential to develop a new paradigm that draws together the synergies between the different positions This is an attempt to bring together churches and ecumenical partners from the North, South, East and West to analyze, reflect and act together on discovering new and creative ways how global wealth can be used to eradicate poverty. Millennium Development Goal #8, which challenges countries to increase resources for meeting the other goals, will be addressed, while WCC will monitor the lack of real progress in eradicating poverty. The relationship between poverty, wealth and ecology in the context of the "Alternative Globalization Addressing People and Earth" (AGAPE) document's call will be followed up by joining hands with ecumenical partners and churches in acting on just trade, ecological debt, decent work, etc. It is also proposed to produce a "consumption and greed line" alongside the "poverty line" as a guideline for Christians. 

Financial summary 2007-2009 

P3 - Public Witness: Addressing Power, Affirming Peace

2007

2008

2009

Implementation costs

 

 

 

P301 - Decade to Overcome Violence

245,000

245,000

245,000

P302 - Global advocacy for justice and accountability

265,000

265,000

265,000

P303 - Human rights to enhance human dignity

180,000

181,000

181,000

P304 - Churches and the Middle East : solidarity and witness for peace

225,025

226,000

226,000

P305 - Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel

686,000

686,000

686,000

P306 - Poverty, wealth, ecology: reflection and action

303,000

300,000

300,000

Staff and related costs

2,464,851

2,464,851

2,464,851

Total direct costs

4,368,876

4,367,851

4,367,851

Infrastructure costs

921,609

921,609

921,609

Total programme costs

5,290,485

5,289,460

5,289,460



Background

The Justice and Diakonia programme builds on the ecumenical commitment to justice and to enhancing the potential and power of the people to transform their own lives and livelihoods. Bringing the WCC's work with justice and diakonia together in one programme will strengthen the Council's ability to have an impact on churches' engagement in both meeting immediate human needs and in addressing the structural roots of injustice. The WCC is uniquely placed to facilitate expressions of ecumenical solidarity, reflect on issues of accountability, support the churches' healing ministries, as well as strengthen the churches' reflections and actions on ecological and bioethical issues. The power of structural injustice threatens to destroy the web of life, and this is accelerated by the capacities of new technologies, if misused - hence the urgency for a project on faith, science and technology.

This programme responds to the expressed needs of the WCC's broad constituency, including member churches, ecumenical organizations and networks, and specialized ministries. The seven projects in this programme all reflect a commitment to bringing together different aspects of ecumenical engagement with justice and diakonia in new ways. For example, the Council's engagement with the issue of HIV and AIDS will be more closely integrated with justice and diakonia. Work in this programme is closely related to the Council's other programmatic work. Working for both justice and health, for example, requires close collaboration with the Council's projects in public witness.

Several aspects of science and technology challenge our faith. For example, bio-ethical issues are sometimes 'church-dividing' issues and thus the WCC's work in this area will be closely related to its programme on Unity, Mission and Spirituality. Expressions of ecumenical solidarity are a concrete means of strengthening relationships within the fellowship. Migration is changing the ecclesial landscape, and the work on this issue will thus be strengthened within the context of changing understandings of 'being church'. Work on climate change and the right to water are linked with the struggle for economic justice.

By bringing together work on justice and diakonia, it will also be possible to deepen our conceptual and theological understanding of the interconnections between transformational justice and prophetic diakonia. This in turn should enable a more holistic response from the churches to the situations that confront them.

Goals and criteria for achievement

Goal 4a: The WCC has fostered the commitment and actions of churches and ecumenical organizations to work together in life-affirming social and economic transformation.

  • The WCC has accompanied and strengthened the capacities of the churches in their efforts both to serve people in need and to advocate for more just structures. (Project P401)

  • The WCC has played an effective role in holding members of the ecumenical family accountable to each other in their contributions to the struggles for justice and in the sharing of resources. (Project P402)

  • The WCC has strengthened the engagement of churches with issues of migration within a framework of transformative justice. (Project P403)

Goal 4b: The WCC has contributed to the quest for transformative justice and the dignity of life by strengthening the work of the churches and ecumenical organizations on bioethics and ecological concerns.

  • The WCC has facilitated research and fostered cooperation among churches and ecumenical organizations on issues of science and technology. (Project P404)

  • The WCC has strengthened the role of the churches, ecumenical organizations and ecumenical networks in advocacy on climate change and water. (Project P405)

Goal 4c: The WCC has strengthened the churches' commitment and action to work together in addressing health and healing from a holistic perspective, with a particular focus on HIV/AIDS and mental health.

  • The WCC has facilitated deeper understanding on health issues, particularly HIV/AIDS and mental health, and their theological and ethical implications for the churches. (Projects P406 and P407)

  • The WCC has strengthened its health-related constituency's advocacy, networking and formation by facilitating their participation in international fora dealing with health issues. (Project 406)

Projects 2007-2009

P401   Ecumenical solidarity

From its inception, the WCC has always held together theological reflection, practical expressions of solidarity to assuage pressing human needs and enabling churches to work together to address the root causes that call for practical solidarity. Ecumenical solidarity thus takes many forms: pastoral visits to churches facing difficult situations, practical expressions of solidarity, working with churches to strengthen their organizational capacities, sharing resources produced by the WCC on accounting and reporting standards as a way of building churches' capacity in this area, and providing timely resources to support strategic initiatives.. This project aims at promoting practical actions of solidarity which reflect the ecumenical commitment to sharing resources amidst growing poverty, displacement, exclusion etc. The present project builds on past experiences in diaconal work, adapting it to meet new challenges.

P402  Mutual accountability

This project will reflect on issues of mutual accountability in the ecumenical movement, with a particular focus on work for justice and diakonia. Theological reflection on mutual accountability will be complemented by an active WCC role in monitoring accountability within the ecumenical family. The project will also continue to provide support for national and regional Round Tables as needed, including accompaniment, mediation and coordination. In the course of 2007, different organizational models for the Eastern European office will be explored and implemented in the 2008-2009 period.

P403   Migration and social justice

This project seeks to strengthen the engagement of churches and their partners with the complex issue of migration. While some of the Council?s traditional networking and advocacy work with uprooted people will continue, new dimensions will be incorporated by exploring the linkages between migration, racism and interfaith relations. A particular focus of the project will be on the ways that migration is changing the churches and creating new ecclesial realities.

P404   Faith, science and technology

From genetically modified seeds to the harvesting of human eggs for genetic and stem-cell research or to bionic legs and artificial intelligence: new emerging technologies affect the lives of people in many places around the world. Some of the new challenges encountered threaten to divide churches and call into question deeply rooted faith convictions. This project will work in close cooperation with selected national councils of churches, specialized departments of the churches and the World Association for Christian Communication in the establishment of an ecumenical space and a network to engage with each other on the emerging challenges of new technologies to life. This includes opportunities for ecumenical reflection and advocacy on the issues at stake for people and the future of life on the earth. The focus will be on the use and misuse of science and new technologies, for example, bio-technologies and information, energy, and surveillance technologies.

P405   Climate change and water: caring for creation

Climate change affects people all around the world, but violent storms, droughts, floods and the rising sea level have devastating consequences especially on the poor and more vulnerable communities. Climate change also aggravates the water crisis that is felt more and more in many places around the world. The WCC will hold together, in dialogue, the concerns for climate change and water, thus emphasizing the links between ecological and social concerns, emergencies and development, global threats and local experiences, local engagement and national and international advocacy. The new Ecumenical Water Network (EWN) has profited from the experience of partners working on climate change, and will continue to involve in a more active way specialized ministries and regional ecumenical organizations in work focusing on the right to water and community-based initiatives. A new emphasis will be given to a study on energy supply and production with links drawn to security concerns, as churches in the Pacific have underlined both the threat of rising sea levels and nuclear testing in their region.

P406   Health and healing

This project will contribute to strengthening the churches' work in the field of health and healing, with particular emphases on HIV. The recent challenges from the WHO to take cognizance of the situation of mental health of populations challenges the churches to reflect on the theological and ethical imperative for their intervention and action in this area of concern. Networking and advocacy at the international level will be facilitated for ecumenical health-related networks. Theological reflection on HIV and on mental health will be facilitated, practical guidance for increasing churches' competencies in relation to HIV will be developed, and faith communities will be equipped to broaden their engagement with mental health.

P407   Ecumenical HIV/AIDS Initiative in Africa (EHAIA)

EHAIA will contribute to the strengthening of the ability of churches in Africa to respond to HIV and AIDS in their region, in preventing the spread of the pandemic, providing care and counseling for those affected, and working for the elimination of stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV and AIDS. Consultations, training, workshops, publications and individual advice will be provided for churches and ecumenical organizations working in the region. 

Financial summary 2007-2009

P4 - Justice and Diakonia

2007

2008

2009

Implementation costs

 

 

 

P401 - Ecumenical solidarity

1,200,000

1,200,000

1,200,000

P402 - Mutual accountability

362,700

402,000

367,000

P403 - Migration and social justice

225,177

231,000

186,000

P404 - Faith, science and technology

63,000

85,000

105,000

P405 - Climate change and water: caring for creation

162,000

185,000

190,000

P406 - Health and healing

310,000

270,000

270,000

P407 - Ecumenical HIV/AIDS Initiative in Africa

1,637,736

1,640,000

1,640,000

Staff and related costs

2,250,720

2,250,720

2,250,720

Total direct costs

6,211,333

6,263,720

6,208,720

Infrastructure costs

829,448

829,448

829,448

Total programme costs

7,040,781

7,093,168

7,038,168

The Ecumenical Solidarity Fund will enable the expression of solidarity between churches and related partners, with a special emphasis on supporting youth. This fund will bring together existing WCC funding instruments including Ecumenical Theological Education, the Strategic Initiatives Fund, capacity-building grants, Urban Rural Mission, the Special Fund to Combat Racism, support for human rights and other initiatives. The Fund will be a Council-wide initiative with the participation of staff working in all programmes. Care will be taken to develop criteria and procedures to respect designation of funds for particular activities.

While many specialized ministries are involved in supporting diaconal work by ecumenical partners, the WCC provides a unique space for enabling this Multilateral Solidarity or multilateral sharing of resources. While specialized ministries usually have designated certain countries or regions as priorities for their work, the WCC is able to respond to churches in all regions and thus to counteract some of the negative effects of the concentration policies of specialized ministries. By engaging in multilateral sharing, the WCC's work in other areas, such as advocacy and analysis, is strengthened.

A comprehensive review of multilateral sharing was carried out in 2004. The review made a number of recommendations for systematizing and streamlining the system of multilateral sharing. Specifically the review suggested that the focus of multilateral sharing be directed towards building capacities of churches. Multilateral sharing will be phased out in the next three years, in consultation with partners. 

Ecumenical Solidarity Fund - including Strategic Initiatives Fund, capacity building, Ecumenical Theological Education, Special Fund to Combat Racism, Urban Rural Mission, etc. *

1,200,000

* This amount is included in the project P401 

Multilateral Solidarity **

1,750,000

** This amount is counted separately from the programme figures

Background

Ecumenical formation has been increasingly recognized as vital for the renewal of the ecumenical movement. However, many leaders and people in the churches and in ecumenical networks and organizations lack opportunities to gain ecumenical experience and knowledge. The vision of ecumenism which drove the development of the ecumenical movement needs to be renewed. In underlining this, the 9th Assembly called for ecumenical formation to be a programme priority and an aspect of all that the WCC does.

Processes of ecumenical formation are inextricably related to processes of faith formation. Faith formation is not a new area for the WCC as it had inherited, through the World Council on Christian Education, a concern for basic Christian formation and, through the International Missionary Council, a concern for theological formation. The Christian nurture and formation that takes place in the life of the churches and their educational and research institutions can open people to all that God offers us through others, or it may engender a suspicion of those who are different. This programme will encourage forms of Christian nurture that are ecumenical in purpose. It will also emphasize ecumenical formation based in the formation of Christian values, attitudes and ways of relating to the other.

The historical division between ecumenical formation coordinated at the Ecumenical Centre and at the Ecumenical Institute, Bossey, has proved to be unhelpful. The programme integrates the two strong yet differently focused traditions of supporting and doing ecumenical formation in the WCC. The field of ecumenical and faith formation will be mapped and further conceptualized. There will be direct delivery of formal and informal ecumenical and faith formation opportunities. Those offering such opportunities in the ecumenical movement (churches, councils, ecumenical bodies and institutions) will be supported conceptually, methodologically and, where appropriate, with resources.

Ecumenical and faith formation is always contextual. This means that some resources will be found locally. However, the programme will also offer a global dimension through the content and concerns of other WCC programmes.

The key highlights of the programme are: the opportunities for ecumenical formation offered at Bossey and in the constituency; the development of capacity, curricula and methodologies for contextualized ecumenical and faith formation; and a growing synergy between partners.

Goals and criteria for achievement

Goal 5a: The WCC has developed processes of ecumenical and faith formation to encourage churches, institutions and networks to become ecumenical in their relationships and actions.

  • The WCC has formed a network of educators and practitioners in ecumenical and faith formation. (Project P501)

  • The WCC is active in mutual capacity strengthening for ecumenical formation and in the development of contextual models, methodologies, curricula and resources. (Projects P501, P502 and P503)

  • The WCC has offered opportunities and support for ecumenical and faith formation through seminars, workshops and scholarships. (Projects P501 and P503)

Goal 5b: The WCC has further developed the Ecumenical Institute, Bossey, as a laboratory of the ecumenical movement for encounter, dialogue and formation.

  • The WCC has continued to facilitate formal ecumenical formation of younger leaders and has provided spaces for reflection on emerging challenges. (Project P503)

Projects 2007-2009

P501   Ecumenical Institute, Bossey

Through its worship, community life and formal study, Bossey provides a unique experience of ecumenical formation. Bossey offers seminar programmes and graduate and post-graduate education in ecumenical studies for participants from WCC member and other churches. Through its range of activities, Bossey creates opportunities for engagement by church groups, issue-based networks, church leaders and theologians. As a laboratory for the ecumenical movement, Bossey is able to create spaces for the exploration of challenging issues in the ecumenical movement.

P502   Enabling ecumenical and faith formation

This project embodies three strategic approaches to encouraging and supporting ecumenical and faith formation in the ecumenical movement: a network of practice, seminars/workshops, and scholarships. Existing networks and partnerships will be used to build a dedicated network of practitioners of ecumenical and faith formation from churches, institutions and individuals. It will be a network of commitment to good practice and action-research with the sharing and joint development of concepts, methodologies, curricula and resources.

Workshops/seminars and exchanges will be organized in and for the constituency to form key personnel and to disseminate good practices. Scholarships will be awarded to groups and individuals where their churches or ecumenical bodies have identified a need for human resource development to fulfil their mission.

P503   Contextual ecumenical theological education

Future church leaders and pastors need to be formed in such a way that they are able to engage ecumenically and theologically with the issues that confront their society. However, theological institutions often lack an ecumenical orientation and the necessary capacity and skills to offer ecumenical formation. This activity will work regionally to engage and strengthen the ecumenical focus of theological educators and institutions.

This will go hand in hand with the development of curricula that can integrate a contextual and ecumenical approach to learning and training. It will use the approach successfully developed for creating curricula relating to HIV/AIDS and disability, sharing curriculum development and pedagogical skills within a region and drawing on the knowledge created through WCC programmatic work in other areas.

P504 - Library and archives

The wealth of books and archives held by the WCC as a trustee of the ecumenical movement provides a unique opportunity for research and for the writing of theses on ecumenical themes. The WCC will continue to develop its library and archives in close connection with the Bossey Ecumenical Institute and the University of Geneva and will encourage students and others to use these resources for their own research. It will also provide its services to students from all parts of the world who engage in research on ecumenical topics.

Financial summary 2007-2009

P5 - Ecumenical and Faith Formation

2007

2008

2009

Implementation costs

 

 

 

P501 - Ecumenical Institute, Bossey

1,197,227

1,197,000

1,197,000

P502 - Enabling ecumenical and faith formation

1,264,000

1,284,000

1,284,000

P503 - Contextual ecumenical theological education

225,000

225,000

225,000

P504 - Library and archives

33,300

34,000

34,000

Staff and related costs

1,754,528

1,754,528

1,754,528

Total direct costs

4,474,055

4,494,528

4,494,528

Infrastructure costs

599,046

599,046

599,046

Total programme costs

5,073,101

5,093,574

5,093,574

 

 

 

 

Bossey operations and hotel costs

1,985,012

1,985,012

1,985,012

Overall total

7,058,113

7,078,585

7,078,585

Background

Religion is arguably a powerful and pervasive human force on earth.  In history, more wars have been waged and many people killed in the name of religion. While religion had been pushed to the margins of political life by the middle of the 20th century, at the dawn of the 21st century there has been a resurgence of religion. It has occupied a critical space in public life, and has become a significant identity marker. Religions hold conflicting truth claims. In an increasingly pluralistic society, more inter-religious dialogue and cooperation is imperative if religious conflicts are to be avoided. The motivation behind the tragic events of 11 September 2001 in New York and Washington DC and the wars that followed might not be obvious to the general public, but claims by some who associated themselves with the events reveal a religious worldview seeking to justify the attacks. Religious sentiments were also evoked in support of the counterattacks.

To achieve a harmonious and peaceful life in a world characterized by religious diversity, global interdependence, political and social instability and changing cultural values, there is need for better understanding and cooperation among people of different faiths tapping the spiritual and religious traditions for sustainable values and a dignified life for all. Dialogue itself needs to be approached at the pragmatic and paradigmatic level. At a pragmatic level, the urgency is to promote inter-religious cooperation. At the same time, today's interdependent society demands new paradigms that allow for new ways of understanding particularity and pluralism. Many traditional ways of viewing the world and relating to others are no longer adequate. What is needed is for people to gain capacity and confidence to live their faith with integrity while living together in mutual respect and mutual acceptance.

An aide-mémoire to a multifaith consultation on interreligious initiatives, organized by the WCC recognized that:  "There is a growing interest today in multifaith approaches to issues of common concern. This interest is paralleled with a proliferation of different international interreligious initiatives, gaining a measure of appeal. There is a demand that there be adequate responses from faith communities to these initiatives. The numerous interreligious initiatives are varied in respect to scope, impact, and the actors they involve. A main interest is at best to promote and stimulate debate and exchange of ideas, facilitate the recognition of shared values and foster respect and tolerance for diversity."  Many churches and ecumenical partners have engaged in inter-religious dialogue and cooperation as they recognize the urgency of such engagement.  So as to bring greater ecumenical coherence, the WCC will play a coordinating role so as to garner strength from these many efforts.  The WCC is in place to bring together Christians of many traditions to reflect on what it means to be Christian in a context of many religions. 

Projects in this programme focus on: deepening mutual trust through inter-religious dialogue and cooperation; intra-Christian theological exploration to enable churches to re-articulate their self-understanding, building upon experiences gained in and through inter-religious dialogue, identifying and addressing gaps in current dialogues on gender issues and conflict, and the interaction of youth and religious life; and intentional accompaniment of churches in situations of tension and conflict.

The inner coherence between all projects is the attempt to enable not just dialogue with people of other faiths but to strive towards greater understanding, genuine relationships and cooperation among people of diverse faiths. The main challenges to be addressed include increased awareness of religious plurality, the potential role of religion in conflict, and the growing place of religion in public life.

The programme links to the WCC's work on public witness in addressing the role of religion in public life and the life of churches in minority situations. The programme links to discussions on the mission of the church and its theological self-understanding as well as to education and ecumenical formation.

Goals and criteria for achievement

Goal 6a: In dialogue with people of other faiths and in ecumenical conversations, the WCC has addressed challenges for religion in a world of religious plurality and explored ways to enhance understanding and cooperation in order to minimize doubts and fears that people have of each other.

  • The WCC has through dialogue and cooperation engaged partners of other faiths in articulating common values and explored ways to address divisive issues. (Project P601)

  • The WCC has identified the challenges that a religiously plural world provides for Christian self-understanding and witness, and has enabled an ecumenical response. (Project P602)

  • The WCC has identified and pursued emerging issues in inter-religious cooperation with a focus on integrating analysis on gender and cross-generational differences or realities. Project P601)

Goal 6b: The WCC has accompanied churches in situations of religious intolerance, discrimination and conflict.

  • The WCC has accompanied churches in minority situations and provided pastoral support as well as involved member churches in establishing the foundation for inter-religious cooperation.

Projects 2007-2009

P601 - Strengthening inter-religious trust and respect

This project will further bilateral and multilateral explorations in inter-religious relations on issues of common concern as well as of friction. Religious communities live together in local contexts, where they thrive and enjoy good neighborly relations. There is however also another story, which witnesses to Christians and Muslims, Christians and Hindus and Christians and Buddhists living next to each other but in mutual ignorance, in isolation and at worst in situations of conflict and fear of each other. The WCC recognizes the urgent need to develop greater and better relations between Christians and their neighbors of other faiths. As the former Moderator of the WCC Central Committee, HH Aram I, stated it: "The rise of fundamentalism and the re-emergence of ethnocentricity are steadily penetrating all parts of the world and all domains of society life. How can we promote dialogue among cultures to ensure the harmonious coexistence and peaceful integration of liberal and conservative values?  In fact, religions can easily be used to dramatize hostile stereotypes. They can also play a pivotal role in establishing channels of communication, bridges of reconciliation among hostile communities."

Next to cultivating and deepening relations with people of other faiths through bilateral dialogues, the project will place particular emphasis on contemporary and cutting-edge issues in today's religiously plural societies. It will also explore new ways of communicating issues pertaining to inter-religious dialogue on around issues such as religion and violence and "the Other" in our religious traditions. Following up "Critical Moment" conference in June 2005, discussions will continue on the issue of conversion.

The project will provide a space for young adults on themes related to religious identities and the construction of meaning in pluralist societies. There is a yearning for spirituality among youth, not always in a strictly religious sense, but in a wider sense that is often disconnected from institutionalized religion and dogmas, rites and religious practices, following a conscious move towards autonomy. The intention is to facilitate both regional and cross-cultural encounters of young adults.

Women play a key role in many communities to overcome religious divisions in order to build communities of peace and reconciliation. The WCC has over the years supported many such initiatives and has recognized the contributions of women stepping over religious divides to work for peace, particularly in conflict situations. Additionally, the WCC will continue to support women when they challenge the ways in which religions are used to legitimize customs and practices that are violent against women.

P602 - Christian self-understanding amid many religions

This project will interpret findings in bilateral and multilateral dialogues so as to engage the churches in reflections on Christian self-understanding and it will take up the challenges from the assembly for more intra-Christian dialogue to explore what it means to be a Christian in a world of many religions. "To be a Christian is not to lay claim to absolute knowledge, but to lay claim to the perspective that will transform our most deeply rooted hurts and fears and so change the world at the most important level." This project will address this challenge given the churches at the assembly by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams.

Through this project and particularly in the activity on conversion as an issue in interreligious relations, the WCC will enable a dialogue among Christian communities, including Pentecostal and evangelical churches to explore Christian self-understanding in a world of many religions.  The WCC sees itself playing a bridging role between very diverse and hostile approaches to dialogue and cooperation with people of other faiths and will through creating the space for dialogue encourage honest discussions and reflections on our role as Christians in a religiously plural world.

P603 - Accompanying churches in situations of conflict

There is an increasing awareness that religion plays a central role in civil and political life. Religious symbols and idioms in some countries are used to manipulate and promote political powers and interests, causing tensions and conflicts between communities. There is a growing environment of religious intolerance that has a negative effect on societies. This project will emphasize the positive aspects in all religions in order to promote peace and harmony among communities.

The project will be undertaken initially in five countries in areas where religions are used to fuel conflict, in response to requests for support from national councils of churches. The activities of this project will be linked to other programmatic areas of the WCC addressing issues of ecumenical relations, justice and peace. The project will accompany churches and communities faced with an environment of religious intolerance, discrimination and conflict and will equip them through capacity building and advocacy for change.

Financial summary 2007-2009

P6 - Inter-religious Dialogue and Cooperation

2007

2008

2009

Implementation costs

 

 

 

P601 - Strengthening inter-religious trust and respect

105,000

105,000

105,000

P602 - Christian self-understanding amid many religions

67,500

85,000

85,000

P603 - Accompanying churches in situations of conflict

94,300

94,000

94,000

Staff and related costs

613,167

613,167

613,167

Total direct costs

879,967

897,167

897,167

Infrastructure costs

276,483

276,483

276,483

Total programme costs

1,156,449

1,173,649

1,173,649

Background

Giving visibility to the work of the World Council of Churches in the media is a primary task of the Council. The WCC is committed to bring to the world, through the church and secular media, the ethical and moral alternative voice of the churches and the ecumenical movement. While there is little interest in the secular media for institutional religious life, there is a growing interest in moral and ethical perspectives on major challenges in public life, politics, economics and environment. Recently, the secretary general of the UN, Kofi Annan, remarked that, "Religion makes news when it is seen as a source of conflict". On the other hand, the media are also interested in knowing how the churches respond to religiously motivated violence. In a world of so much fragmentation and injustice, the search for alternative paradigms, based on values that affirm life, becomes an ecumenical imperative.

So much of the WCC's work, therefore, can be of interest to the media. What is needed is an accompanying communications strategy and plan that will ensure that there are quickly and accurately prepared and interesting stories, statements, briefings for the media. Strategic press conferences, organized interviews and thoroughly researched speaking notes for the general secretary (or his appointed spokesperson) for immediate responses to world affairs is an urgent need. The communications staff of the WCC will work in close conjunction with the programme staff covering other areas of work to ensure a coherence between programmatic work and communications.

The WCC's central vision is of the churches working together for visible unity and for transformation of the world and society. In the quest to deepen and broaden the fellowship, a good communications strategy will support the realization of this vision.

As communications technologies, methodologies and their potential develop so rapidly, the WCC is challenged to utilize to the full communications possibilities to transmit its message. The WCC will use multi-media approaches to do this. Different constituencies require different messages and target media outlets (i.e. specialized or general mass media; church related or secular media). It is imperative to enhance the professional and creative capacities of the communications programme in the WCC that will respond to these different needs in a timely and appropriate manner.

Additionally, as an international organization and as a fellowship of churches with diverse confessional and linguistic constituencies, an overall communications policy should also be about the Council, about the churches, deepening the fellowship among them. Information can be used to inform membership and the public in general; to promote the institution; to be accountable to constituencies; and to educate and empower them to take greater ownership of the work and coordinating role of the WCC. Some programmes of the WCC will require a simpler form of communication and staff training and development can be adequate for this, so that a communications office can deal with what requires more focused attention to get the message out to the world.

The WCC communications programme has the capability to contribute to the new vision of an interactive and integrated approach to the work of the WCC and to develop partnerships with the churches and ecumenical partners for doing this work. Therefore, the strategy needs to develop ways of highlighting work done by churches and partners in a few selected programmes of the WCC where partnerships have developed.

In the development of communications technical services, it is important to seek ways of pooling the needed technical capacities with departments of communication of sister organizations at the Ecumenical Centre in Geneva, so as to share resources and thus to maximize the potentials for developing, up-to-date and efficient technical support systems.

Goals and criteria for achievement

Goal Ca. The WCC has set in place an effective leadership to ensure that there is a coordinated and effective approach to communications.

  • The WCC, as an instrument of the churches, has set in place a communications team that is viable, competent and equipped with the potential to give visibility to the work of the WCC

  • The WCC has set in place effective processes for the voice of the WCC General Secretary/WCC to be able to be heard in a timely and accurate manner.

Goal Cb. The WCC has made inroads into the secular and Christian media and has raised the voice of the churches on important public issues that require the ethical and moral response of the churches.

  • The WCC has made contact with some of the major secular media on some crucial issues.

  • The WCC has worked with the churches in ensuring that the Christian media covers well stories from the work of the WCC.

Goal Cc. The WCC has, in cooperation with sister organizations in the Ecumenical Centre, set up effective and up-to-date technical equipment to ensure that the WCC has the possibility to communicate efficiently.

  • The WCC has built a common strategy with sister organizations on developing the required expertise and technical facilities.

  • The WCC has built cooperative links with the churches, specialized ministries and ecumenical partners to share information and available human and technical resources.

Projects 2007-2009

C101 - Giving voice and witness in the world

Direction and coordination of public voice of the WCC : To provide greater visibility to the work and vision of the WCC in the secular and religious media and to have put in place instruments for enhancing the public voice of the WCC through the General Secretary.

Web and image office : To set in place an attractive and user friendly web site for the WCC that is responsive to all the programme needs.

Visual arts office : To ensure good management of the photo service of the WCC and the archives ant to strengthen policies on access.

Publishing books and producing other media tools : To have developed a good policy on publications to respond to the programme needs for printed and other resources.

Language services : To continue to provide interpretation and translation services in the working languages of the WCC.

Financial summary 2007-2009

C1 - Communications

2007

2008

2009

Implementation costs

 

 

 

C101 - Giving voice and witness in the world

766,700

766,700

766,700

Staff and related costs

1,860,000

1,860,000

1,860,000

Total direct costs

2,626,700

2,626,700

2,626,700

Infrastructure costs

368,644

368,644

368,644

Total programme costs

2,995,344

2,995,344

2,995,344

CORE FUNCTIONS

Background

The Programme Plan 2006 predicted that "facilitation of responsible stewardship of human, financial and physical resources of the Council" (effective management at all levels) would be a main priority of the Council after the assembly. The assembly affirmed this. To ensure effective support to the new programme structure, and to reflect a new emphasis on closer integration of related services, the present configuration of the management sector is under review and will most likely be modified at central committee in September 2006

Some of the recommendations made at the assembly relating to effective management are:

That planning and budgeting be based on clearly articulated goals, objectives, criteria for achievement. This included the establishment of a professional planning, monitoring, evaluation and reporting (PMER) function at the Council; the process is now underway.

That all members churches meet financial responsibilities by contributing at least the minimum fee of CHF 1,000, as a demonstration of their commitment to the fellowship.

That the Council adopt working methods which leverage the resources in the ecumenical fellowship.

That the Council adopt effective income development, fundraising strategies and plans that ensure the importance of the continued work in building common understanding and trust with the funding partners.

That a comprehensive review of the Council's staff rules and regulations and personnel policies be implemented; and that policies include the intentional recruitment of younger staff to ensure their participation in the transformation of the organization.

Integrated way of working

Plans to implement a more integrated way of working across the present teams and offices offering management services are to address not only the improved integration between the management teams, but between the programme teams and the management teams; the emphasis will be on teamwork, tools and training.

Computer and Information Services, while focusing on working to harness IT for the mission of the Council, will work more interactively with all management services, and communications. Tools to be implemented to improve integration across all teams include database tools to support the PMER process; a time management system; and, integrated with the PMER process, support for continued development in for financial monitoring and reporting.

Fund Development/Income Monitoring and Development will work even more closely with programme areas, communications staff and financial management services.

Financial management services will work towards closer collaboration and sharing of tasks between accounting and treasury functions; planning and budgeting functions; and finance business (House Services) functions. Focus will be placed on meeting programme financial service needs, and on training and sharing experience with programme and other management team staff to foster the understanding of controls and policies.

Human resources services, whilst focusing attention on staff development, staff welfare and staff rules and regulations and personnel policies, will develop closer interactive links with financial management services, programme areas and external structures of the Council.

Goals and criteria for achievement

Goal a: The Council has developed a common working culture grounded in mutual trust and sharing, encouraging creativity and proactive change.

There is evidence of a working environment that both fosters respect and values diversity.

Staff are motivated and encouraged to increase their capacities and competencies to achieve higher performance through an open training and development programme especially in the areas of programme and project, PMER and management and leadership development.

Staff in management service teams collaborate with programme staff to implement a new working tool or method together, with direct impact on project results and/or the manner of delivery or communication of the project.

Goal b: The Council has defined management policies and processes supported by leadership and management, introduced and sustained through on-going training and accompaniment, owned by all, and implemented with accountability for all.

Management policies are updated according to a plan, and are issued.

General training sessions on policies are implemented.

Processes are in place which foster learning from practice and experience.

Goal c: The Council has developed, implemented and managed an integrated tool-set to plan, budget, monitor, evaluate and report on the Council's programme activities.

The tools are implemented.

Staff are trained in the use of the tools, or those elements of the tools which are necessary for their function.

It is evident to the members churches and partners that the quality and efficiency in management, monitoring and reporting of project work has improved.

Each of the management services will develop goals and criteria for achievement for the specific areas of their work. The goals and criteria for achievement will focus on fulfillment of the overall goals above.

The key task of the management teams is to provide both an environment and the practical means for the programmes teams and special offices to carry out efficiently the activities within their mandate. The aim is to ensure that the management areas are staffed by persons with professional skills and experience in the management of a particular type of resource whose administration is essential for the activities of the WCC. Each area has primary responsibility within the WCC for the provision and administration of its particular area of infrastructure support.

The teams serve the entire Council staff by providing effective and efficient support, working co-operatively on a continuing basis with all other teams and the offices of the General Secretariat.

Management projects

Project 1: Equipping the Council to effect change

The 9th assembly adopted fundamental recommendations that will affect the way the Council works as an institution as well as how staff will work in the future. For example, new guiding principles were introduced for programmes; a new PMER desk was recommended; and staff are required to work in integrated and interactive ways. New areas of work were also proposed.

The changes recommended would alter the way that WCC delivers both its programme and management work and will require changes in the mindset, working style and skills of the staff who implement them. All staff in general will be required to learn new skills or to improve current abilities, while some, whose former role descriptions will have changed significantly or will have new assignments, will need particular training and/or exposure. A fresh understanding of management and relations will also be needed.

The changes ushered in at Porto Alegre require a robust strategy and appropriate resources over and above the normal processes of staff development.

Project 2: Upgrading working tools

The assembly also asked for the renewal of the tools and processes the Council uses to accomplish its priorities. Examples are the development of database programme management tools, improvement of human resource time management tools and continued improvement of financial management and reporting tools.

This project includes:

i-Scala : completion of report-writing after system upgrade 2006

WCC Manual: Policies and Procedures

Contacts events and projects database

Electronic documents management, publishing and archiving

Human resources time-management tools 

Management Services Financial Summary for 2007

Expenditure covered by rental and other income

3,019,958

Expenditure allocated to programmes

4,469,804

Total cost of Management Services

7,489,762

The participatory, interactive and integrated process the WCC has followed as the methodology for planning the work for the period 2007-2013 demonstrates the commitment to develop a new culture. The WCC is in the process of learning, and therefore recognizes that as the three-year rolling cycle develops we will be able more intentionally to refine the planning process and make it even more effective. The attempt is to make all facets of the process as transparent as possible and make the work accountable to partners at all levels. The PMER office will cover all aspects of the life of the WCC, holding together programmes with relationships, communications and stewardship of financial and personnel resources.

The setting up of an office for PMER in the General Secretariat, to be further strengthened after the Central Committee of the WCC in September, responds to the 9th Assembly's Programme Guidelines Committee recommendation that "clear, well-functioning planning, monitoring and evaluation mechanisms be established for each programme". The Finance Committee also recommended that "one-year objectives and expected outcomes should be submitted for approval as part of three-year rolling plans" and that proper organization and processes be put in place. In response to this call, the WCC is focusing on three key elements: a clear programmatic framework describing the coherence of the whole plan; processes for ensuring an organization with appropriate staff as required; and processes and tools to organize and coordinate this collective work.

The planning process

The planning cycle will include a planning phase for the following year, which for the next period will begin in February 2007. Monitoring will consist of reviewing all projects regularly throughout the year. The monitoring mechanism, to be further developed, will include four dimensions: (1) ensuring that the plans for the work are on track, and identifying problems being encountered early enough to propose changes or to accompany staff in the implementation; (2) ensuring that financial resources are being managed within approved budgets, with the help of specialized staff in each project; (3) ensuring the team spirit and participation of all staff in the work, so as to support a well-developed performance appraisal process; and (4) ensuring the organization is effective in term of information sharing, coordination and integration. Brief evaluations of the work accomplished will be conducted at the end of the year when reports are being produced. A complete external evaluation will be conducted at a mid-term stage between assemblies, and again before the next assembly.

The programme structure

This framework, described in detail on page 12 in "The programme structure", includes seven-year programmes with goals and criteria for achievement, projects in a three-year rolling cycle, and activities planned over one year with detailed plans and budgets.

(in CHF millions)

table in pdf format

(in CHF millions)

table in pdf format

(in CHF '000)

table in pdf format