World Council of Churches

A worldwide fellowship of churches seeking unity, a common witness and Christian service

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Documents

The term "WCC document" applies to texts of many different types and levels of institutional authority. Many hundreds of such texts are available on our websites.

List of documents by publication date (most recent documents on top):

Please use the advanced search tool to find documents based on their type and topic.

"Perspectives on Migration: Displacement and Marginalization, Inclusion and Justice. An Ecumenical Vision"
"Perspectives on Migration: Displacement and Marginalization, Inclusion and Justice. An Ecumenical Vision" - Speech by Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit, general secretary of the World Council of Churches at the reception hosted by UNICEF, in New York, 22 January 2018, as part of as part of the 4th Annual Symposium on the Role of Religion and Faith-Based Organizations in International Affairs.
Homily during morning prayer at the Ecumenical Centre
Reflection on the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity 2018 by Dr Ani Ghazaryan Drissi, WCC Faith and Order programme executive.
Jerusalem: A city of shared sovereignty, a city of monotheistic religions
Intervention of His Holiness Aram I on the first day of the International Conference in Support of Jerusalem, organized by Al-Azhar, Cairo, Egypt (17-18 January 2018).
Dealings at Davos: Diminished Collaboration Meets Heightened Nuclear Dangers
In a message to the World Economic Forum, World Council of Churches general secretary Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit said he can think of no greater antithesis to a vision of shared life and responsibility than the continued existence of and political and social support for nuclear weapons.
Luke 24:13-35 "Pilgrimage to Emmaus", by Guido Dotti
The journey of the disciples to Emmaus in Luke 24 is not a pilgrimage toward Jerusalem but leaving it disillusionment. It is a journey of finding our hearts burning as the disciples of Emmaus’s hearts were burning at the moment of sharing a meal. The text invites us to find our own Emmaus where our heart to be kindled. Each of us meets unknown pilgrims who hide an unknown Jesus, but especially meets and encounters him- or herself, discovers that that he or she has a heart that hopes, eyes to see and ears to listen, and finds him- or herself in full solidarity with every human being. The story speaks about three places in which we meet the Risen Christ: scripture, eucharist, and community. It is a pilgrimage of hope and of expectation by listening to the Word, breaking the bread, and hearing the voice of the other because everyone is created in God’s image.
Ephesians 2:11-21 "A pilgrimage of unity", by Susan Durber
In the letter to the Ephesians, Paul addresses the particular faith journey that the early Christians found themselves walking. Their pilgrimage is a journey of discovering the unity between Jews and the Gentiles, in which the Gentiles are welcomed into the covenant of promise. It invites us to wonder where God might be doing the work of reconciliation and building bridges today. God’s purpose is to lead all of us into unity with one another and to welcome those who were once strangers into the household. The reconciling love of God reaches beyond any borders.
Matthew 10:1-42 "Jesus Sends Out the Twelve – On a Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace", by Fernando Enns
Jesus sends out his disciples to the world of injustice and violence. The disciples, who are on a pilgrimage, are not saints but ordinary people, and they are not sent with empty hands but with power to force out evil spirits (Matt. 10:1). As Jesus warns the disciples,“I am sending you like lambs into a pack of wolves” (Matt. 10:16). The Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace is not an easy walk. It is a courageous and costly participation in God’s pilgrimage of justice and peace. Today, refugees bring justice and peace because God wants to meet us in them. In this way, the Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace could be a channel of blessing because pilgrims themselves are the recipients.
Micah 6:1-8 "What Does God Expect of You? A Pilgrimage of Reconciliation with God and with Our Neighbor", by Jin Yang Kim
The prophet Micah asks a crucial question in the midst of injustice and violence in 8th-century B.C.E. Judean society: “What does God expect of you?” This is also a question that we must ask ourselves today as we are invited to join in the Pilgrimage of Justice and Peace. The answer is clear: do justice, love kindness, and walk humbly with your God (Micah 6:8). The first two commands stand at the centre of Israel’s faith-talk, concerning the love of neighbour (Lev. 19:18) and the love of God (Deut. 6:5). The third command is to walk humbly, which could be misleading. To walk humbly is the opposite of walking proudly or self-righteously, and actually invites us to the faith journey of self-giving, self-sacrifice, and self-emptying. So the question, “What does God expect of you?” leads us to the restoration of God’s image in us and is an invitation to become agents of transformation in the world.
Utrecht and Uppsala in communion – a WCC-perspective
Speach of the World Council of Churches (WCC) president for Europe Anders Wejryd in Utrecht, Netherlands, congratulating the Old Catholic Church and the Church of Sweden on entering into a communion.
Prayer for the 70th anniversary of the WCC
Adapted from a prayer by Chiara Lubich at the World Council of Churches, 28 October 2002.
Al-Azhar Al-Sharif International Conference on Supporting Jerusalem
Address at the opening session by Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit, in Cairo, 17 January 2018.
Anniversary prayer from the Uniting Church in Australia (2)
A prayer written by Dr Jill Tabart, national president, UCA, 1994-1997; consensus mentor, WCC 9th Assembly; for the 70th anniversary of the World Council of Churches.
An anniversary prayer from the Uniting Church in Sweden
A prayer written by Gerard Willemsen, Uniting Church in Sweden, for the 70th anniversary of the World Council of Churches.
An anniversary prayer from the Evangelical Church of the Lutheran Confession in Brazil
A prayer written by Rev. Silvio Schneider, Evangelical Church of the Lutheran Confession in Brazil, adviser for Global Mission and Ecumene, for the 70th anniversary of the World Council of Churches.
An anniversary prayer from the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland
A prayer written by Rev. Irja Askola, Bishop of Helsinki, Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland, for the 70th anniversary of the World Council of Churches.
Collect
A prayer written by Rev. Canon Jeremy Worthen, secretary for Ecumenical Relations and Theology, Church of England, for the 70th anniversary of the World Council of Churches.
An anniversary prayer from the National Council of Churches in Australia
A prayer written by Bishop Philip Huggins, president of the National Council of Churches in Australia, remembering a WCC meeting with the theme: “The Church is to be a sign of the coming unity of the whole human family”.
Anniversary prayers from the Uniting Church in Australia
A series of prayers written by the Rev. Dorothy McRae-McMahon, retired Australian Uniting Church minister, former national director for Mission of the Uniting Church in Australia (1993), for the 70th anniversary of the World Council of Churches. She was the first woman to moderate the Worship Committee preparing a WCC Assembly.
An anniversary prayer from the Latvian Evangelical Lutheran Church Abroad
A prayer written by Archishop Lauma Zusevics, of the Latvian Evangelical Lutheran Church Abroad, for the 70th anniversary of the World Council of Churches.
Anniversary prayer from the Uniting Church in Australia (1)
A prayer written by the Rev. Dr Chris Walker, national consultant for Christian Unity, Doctrine and Worship, Uniting Church in Australia, for the 70th anniversary of the World Council of Churches